Inspiring STEM Educators

Whole School Risk Assessments

///Whole School Risk Assessments
Whole School Risk Assessments2018-09-06T10:25:24+00:00

This page contains numerous risk assessments for all sorts of school activities. Before using them, please read the general advice under the first tab Whole School Risk Assessment

We have grouped some whole school risk assessments together under appropriate headings in the adjacent tabs. Before using them, please read the advice below.

Important – How to use the whole school risk assessments and protocols

A model risk assessment (RA) is no use unless you:

  • Read it and modify it according to your own circumstances
  • Pass on information to users (pupils, teachers, support staff)

With respect to modifying the risk assessment according to your own circumstances, it is likely that rather than adding additional control measures, you will remove ones that don’t apply. The model risk assessments have to cover all ages and abilities. Take the example of the litter-picking one. For younger children, it is entirely appropriate that somebody should check the area for broken glass and dog mess. For older students, they can simply be warned to avoid it or be instructed on how to deal with it safely.

When tailoring a risk assessment, consider:

    • Who will be involved in the activity? What are their ages, abilities and behaviours?
    • Where will the activity take place? Do you have the same facilities mentioned in the model RA?
    • What resources are available for the activity? Do you have the equipment described in the model RA?

We strongly advise that you don’t simply leave a risk assessment unmodified, thinking that it might be a bit over the top but at least it covers everything. Our experience with science risk assessments is that if hazards that are trivial for a particular age group are included, users become frustrated at what they rightly see as unnecessary measures. This can lead to health and safety not being taken seriously and a focus on the trivial can lead to big issues being overlooked.

Risk assessments and protocols

Some risk assessments refer to other documents designated as “protocols”. This is to avoid extensive duplication. Rather than include the same manual handling advice in several risk assessments, for example, these risk assessments simply make reference to a manual handling protocol. Please note that the SSERC website www.sserc.org.uk has extensive information on health and safety in science and technical classes. This is referred to, but not duplicated, within the whole school risk assessments.

And finally…

Aim to be risk aware, not risk averse. If you want to do something, there’s usually a safe way to do it.

It is particularly important, when using the risk assessments on this page, to consider the age and stage of pupils. Take the “Throwing” one. Nobody would expect that a teacher in a nursery where the children were throwing bean bags would be expected to have any kind of NGB or equivalent qualification! This risk assessment is for secondary school athletics.

For a risk assessment about playground activities, see the section on Places in and Around the School.

Click on a topic to download.

Athletics Activities – Jumping RA
Athletics-Activities-Running-RA
Athletics-Activities-Throwing-RA
Early-years-play-RA
Fitness-Suite-RA
Sand-and-Water-Activities-RA
Swimming-Inflatable-and-Waterslides-RA
Swimming-School-Sessions-RA
Swimming-Pool-Activies-RA
Swimming-Pool-RA
Trampolining

Play_all

The risk assessments cover not just common tasks such as Putting up a Display but processes too, such as Manual Handling.

There is a specialised New and Expectant Mothers guide for those working in science departments on the Science area of the site.

Carektaking duties-RA
Cleaning-RA
Contractors-on-Site-RA
Lone-Working-RA
Moving-equipment-and-furniture-RA
New-and-Expectant-Mothers-RA
Putting-up-displays-RA
Slips-and-trips
Snow-clearing-Staff-RA
Snow-clearing-Volunteers-RA
Use-of-portable-electrical-equipment-RA
Vehicles-on-site-RA

Tasks_all

The risk assessments in this section cover both classrooms, staff work areas, outdoor areas and corridors and stairs.

Note that risk assessment s concerning science and technology rooms and the activities that take place there are covered in a separate section of the SSERC website.

Click on a topic to download.

Art-and-Craft-Room-RA
Classroom-RA
Corridors-and-Stairs-RA
Dance-Studio-RA
Dining-hall-RA
Gym-halls-RA
Home-Economics-Room-RA
Kitchen-RA
Library-RA
Movement-of-pupils-around-site-RA
Office-RA
Outdoor-play-areas-and-lunch-breaktime-supervision-RA
Plant-Room-RA
Playing-Fields-and-all-weather-surfaces-RA
Premises-including-access-and-security-RA
Staff-Room-RA
Staff-work-base-RA
Storage-areas-RA
Use-of-Kiln-RA

Places_all

If you are planning a disco, concert, fete or sports day, you will find risk assessments here that you can adapt. This is one of the areas where myths about health and safety are rife. As you can see, even something like a firework display can take place with sensible risk management.

Click on a topic to download.

Bouncy Castles

Firework display

Indoor Events, Functions in schools

Litter Picking School Event

Outdoor Events, Summer Fete & Sport Days

Download-All

These protocols are documents that cover aspects of health and safety – slips and trips, manual handling and so on – that are likely to feature in a number of risk assessments. For example, the Snow Clearing Risk Assessment refers both to the Manual Handling Protocol and to Slips and Trips. The Putting Up Displays Risk Assessment also refers to these. By avoiding duplicating common advice, we can keep the risk assessments to a more manageable size.

Click on a topic to download.

Bouncy-Castles-protocol
Disposal-of-needles-and-syringes-Protocol
Electrical-Safety-Protocol
Fire-Evacuation-Protocol
Fire-Safety-Protocol
Firework-Displays-protocol
Manual-Handling-Protocol
Noise-at-Work-Protocol
Safety-in-Swimming-Pools-Protocol
Trampoline-Protocol

Download All_protocols