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Welcome to the SSERC website. You can find health & safety, CPD and resources for your chosen subject via the menu bar across the top, by the menu on the left-hand-side or individual subject areas via the links below.

Access - All teaching resources are open access. Health & Safety information requires a log in.

 

Implementation of Curriculum for Excellence and the development of new National Qualifications in Scotland have presented a timely opportunity to revise the way Computing Science is taught in schools and provide a more interesting, up-to-date and engaging experience for both teachers and learners.

Under a joint project, the Royal Society of Edinburgh (RSE), Scotland's National Academy and the BCS, The Chartered Institute of IT, have developed teaching materials that support Computing Science related aspects of Curriculum for Excellence (CfE) in Scotland, years S1 to S3 (broadly ages 11-14). The project has worked with Education Scotland so that aspects of the materials may be used to support parts of the new national qualifications for Computing Science. The project has sought to highlight the value of learners having insight into computational thinking. While CfE is a Scottish initiative, the materials are driven by the latest Computing pedagogy so they have considerably wider international applicability.

The Societies secured funding to second Jeremy Scott, Head of Computing at George Heriot's School, to lead the development work. He has been seconded on a part-time basis since August 2011.

The materials are the result of a project initiated and supported by the RSE and the BCS and with a grant from Education Scotland. The project has received widespread support from universities and industry partners.

Professor Sally Brown, Chair of the RSE/BCS Project Advisory Group explains: "The RSE is pleased at being able to support this very exciting project, involving a range of committed partners. Curriculum for Excellence and the new national qualifications in Scotland provide an excellent opportunity to re-energise the teaching of Computing in schools and highlight its importance to a digitally enabled society. The materials can contribute to this by providing a more interesting, up-to-date and engaging experience for both teachers and learners, an approach which the RSE firmly supports. The materials have been trialled in schools across Scotland to very positive responses from teachers."

Professor John McDermid, Vice-President Engineering & Science and Ambassador of Computing at the BCS adds: "The BCS has made substantial contributions to the Computing at Schools (CAS) initiative, and was delighted to have the opportunity to work with the RSE on this very important initiative. All school children will benefit from having a sound foundation in computing, which these new materials will provide. Significantly, they also have the potential to increase academic interest in the subject and thus to foster an expansion of the numbers studying computer science at University and then entering the profession. Thus the BCS is optimistic that there will be a major long-term benefit from this initiative."

Minister for Learning, Science & Scotland's Languages, Dr Alasdair Allan MSP said: "I welcome the production of the RSE exemplification materials on computing science. They are a valuable resource which will help teachers develop pupils' understanding of core computing concepts and the associated skills as part of Curriculum for Excellence, from early secondary into the new qualifications.

"Young people should have opportunities to undertake learning in computing science, to help them make sense of how computer technology works and can be applied. The relevant and up-to-date contexts in the exemplification produced by Jeremy Scott offers practitioners inspiring ideas for its delivery."

The materials feature exercises with video tutorials, sample answers and additional activities which can be used to both broaden and deepen the topics. They are freely available here on the SSERC website. To get the latest information and all the resources log on to The Royal Society of Edinburgh website.

Four resources comprising tutor and learner materials have been produced :-

A Computing Science Course in Mobile App Development by Jeremy Scott

Implementation of Curriculum for Excellence and the development of new National Qualifications presented a timely opportunity to revise the way Computing Science is taught in schools and to provide a more interesting, up-to-date and engaging experience for both tutors and learners.

This is the third in a series of resources developed by the Royal Society of Edinburgh and the BCS Academy of Computing that exemplify a subset of the Computing Science-related outcomes of CfE at Levels 3 & 4 and beyond (specifically, in this case, National 4 Computing Science).

Click here for a PDF of the Learner notesClick here for a PDF of the Tutor notesThis resource will seek to consolidate Computing concepts introduced in the previous resources  through the medium of mobile app development. In addition to providing a course in programming for mobile devices, it will explore new paradigms in Computing such as mobile technologies and new interfaces, whilst providing ample opportunity for inter-disciplinary linkage.

All three resources build on state-of-the-art understanding of the pedagogy of Computing, drawn from around the world.  This should enable learners to develop both app development skills and deep understanding of core Computing concepts and the ability to think like a computer scientist.

Whilst this resource is intended support tutors’ thinking about how they might translate the intentions of the curriculum into classroom activity, it should not be seen as prescriptive. Rather, it is intended to stimulate innovation and offer tutors the flexibility and opportunity to deploy their creativity and skills in meeting the needs of learners.

Interdisciplinary Learning (IDL)

 

Effective interdisciplinary learning:

 

  • can take the form of individual one-­off projects or longer courses of study
  • is planned around clear purposes
  • is based upon experiences and outcomes drawn from different curriculum areas or subjects within them
  • ensures progression in skills and in knowledge and understanding
  • can provide opportunities for mixed-stage learning which is interest-based.

 


(See the Education Scotland website for further information).

 

SSERC Activities

 

SSERC has produced a number of activities which can be used to support learning and teaching in IDL. A brief description of each activity follows together with links to the various components which make up the activity / resources; in some cases the link will take you to a separate webpage.

 

Let’s Talk ­- a series of activities to encourage discussion and debate in the classroom. The following are available:

 

 

  • Let’s Talk UV - This activity aims to provide teachers with some ideas which they can use to encourage pupils to discuss some of the issues surrounding UV radiation. It will give them background information about UV radiation, the sun-index and skin types and opportunities to consider the dangers of overexposure to UV.

 

  • Let’s Talk Plants Matter ­- This activity could be used when pupils are studying plants and the environment. The activity aims to encourage the pupils to discuss some of the issues and conflicts associated with preserving forests, providing habitats for wild animals within farmland and the importance of plants in the oceans.

 

  • Let’s Talk Environmental Issues ­– the aim of these resources is to provide teachers with materials which will help them to raise environmental science issues with their pupils. This activity could be used with pupils when they are studying environmental science and aims to encourage the pupils to discuss some of the issues and conflicts associated with global environmental issues.

 

  • Let’s Talk Bogs - This activity aims to provide teachers with a resource which will help them to raise some of the environmental science issues relating to the preservation of peat bogs with their pupils. It is written for pupils at CfE second level but it could be modified to be used with younger or older pupils.

 

  • Let’s Talk Diabetes, Diet and Obesity- a discussion-based activity which aims to develop an understanding of some of the health issues associated with being overweight and to encourage discussion of some of the ways in which individuals and society can intervene in this problem.

 

  • Let’s Talk Liver and Alcohol - the activity aims to develop an understanding of the importance of a healthy liver to the body and to consider some of the health and social issues associated with alcohol consumption. The activities c centre on encouraging discussion on the many ways in which alcohol affects the lives of young people and asks them to talk about some of the dangers of drinking too much.

 

  • Let’s Talk Vaccines and Vaccination - the aim of these activities is to develop an understanding of immunity and vaccines and the importance of vaccination programmes in general. It also aims to give the pupils information about Human Papilloma Virus and opportunities to discuss some of the resulting issues.

 

  • Let’s Talk Stem Cells – the aim of this activity is to provide teachers with a resource which supports (i) an understanding of stem cells, (ii) how they can be used therapeutically, and (iii) a discussion activity which raises some of the issues relating to stem cells.  The original research and development for this resource was funded by the Wellcome Trust's 'Engaging Science Scheme'.

 

 

Searching For Meaning - this was a project which sought to answer 2 key questions:

 

  • Can science and RME teachers work together on themes in a way which will enhance pupils' understanding of science/religion issues?
  • What are the resource and CPD needs of both groups and can we establish an effective model for interdisciplinary working. 

 

Waste of Space - is an activity that uses the context of space exploration to encourage wider discussions about the nature of progress and development.

 

A Level Playing Field - this discussion activity, aimed at upper primary and early secondary levels, challenges pupils to consider fairness in sport.

 

 

STEM Education Support Officer

During the period March 2013 to January 2015 Scott Bryce held the post of STEM Education Support officer at SSERC. Scott’s role was supported by a governing body with representation from the following organisations:

  • Education Scotland
  • Deans of Science and Engineering
  • SSERC
  • Industry (Selex Es, SASOL and CBI Scotland)

 

The major aims of Scott’s post were to:

  • To map, evaluate and help co-ordinate current schools engagement with Higher Education and Industry
  • To map, evaluate and help co-ordinate existing STEM Continuing Professional Development (CPD) activity offered by Higher Education and Industry
  • To map and stimulate the use of learning support materials
  • To contribute to the development of Interdisciplinary approaches to enhance the learning experience

 

At the end of Scott’s secondment a summary report was produced and this can be accessed here.

 

Smartphone Microscope

 

One of the areas of development which Scott undertook was the development of a smartphone microscope.  An interim report outlining the successful work carried out is available here.

 

 

 

 

 

According to Education Scotland:

Revisiting a concept or skill from different perspectives deepens understanding, and can also make the curriculum more coherent and meaningful from the learner's point of view.

Interdisciplinary studies can also take advantage of opportunities to work with partners who are able to offer and support enriched learning experiences and opportunities for young people's wider involvement in society.

Effective interdisciplinary learning:

  • can take the form of individual one-­off projects or longer courses of study
  • is planned around clear purposes
  • is based upon experiences and outcomes drawn from different curriculum areas or subjects within them
  • ensures progression in skills and in knowledge and understanding
  • can provide opportunities for mixed-stage learning which is interest-based.

The curriculum should include space for learning beyond subject boundaries, so that children and young people can make connections between different areas of learning.

 

There are various SSERC activities that fit, to some degree or other, into this category and they can be found via the links below:

 

Ellen MacArthur Foundation

The online Disruptive Innovation Festival (DIF) is working with organisations, universities and individuals from all over the world to spotlight and explore the disruptive innovations that are shaking up industry and creating new opportunities in the economy. More information is available here.

 

 

 

AstraZeneca Science Teaching Trust has changed to be the Primary Science Teaching Trust and they have supported the revision and updating of further resources

Activities to encourage discussion and debate in the classroom

azstt logoThe implementation of Curriculum for Excellence (CfE) provides a timely opportunity to consider the way in which aspects of science are taught in our schools and to provide a range of different experiences for both teachers and students.

 

 

 

The Sciences: Principles and Practice [PDF - 217 KB] paper for CfE calls for a variety of approaches to be used in teaching and learning including:

• use of relevant contexts, familiar to young people's experiences
• collaborative learning and independent thinking
• emphasis on children explaining their understanding of concepts, informed discussion and communication.

 

With support from the Primary Science Teaching Trust and its predecessor (the AstraZeneca Science Teaching Trust), SSERC has recently revised and updated a series of resources to support teaching in three areas. All resources are now available and can be accessed by clicking on the relevant section below:

Cakes postcard Liver and Alcohol Agree Disagree b and w
Diet, Diabetes, Obesity The Liver and Alcohol Vaccines and Vaccination
The aim of these activities is to develop an understanding of some of the health issues associated with being overweight and to encourage discussion of some of the ways in which individuals and society can intervene in this problem.

The aim of these activities is to develop an understanding of the importance of a healthy liver to the body and to consider some of the health and social issues associated with alcohol consumption. The activities centre on encouraging discussion on the many ways in which alcohol affects the lives of young people and asks them to talk about some of the dangers of drinking too much.

 

The aim of these activities is to develop an understanding of immunity and vaccines and the importance of vaccination programmes in general. It also aims to give the pupils information about Human Papilloma Virus and opportunities to discuss some of the resulting issues.

AstraZeneca Science Teaching Trust has changed to be the Primary Science Teaching Trust and they have supported the revision and updating of further resourcesMore recently the AstraZeneca Science Teaching Trust has changed to be the Primary Science Teaching Trust and they have supported the revision and updating of further resources - Let's Talk Environmental Issue and Let's Talk Plants Matter. These are now available from the sections below :-

 

Environmental Issues Plants Matter
Environmental Issues Plants Matter

These resources aim to provide teachers with materials which will help them to raise environmental science issues with their pupils. Environmental Issues is written for pupils at second and third level of CfE or Key Stage 2 and 3. The resource also supports the new Scottish National 4 Biology course.

This activity aims to provide teachers with a resource which will help them to raise environmental science issues with their pupils. It is written for pupils at CfE second level or Key Stage 2 but it could be modified to be used with younger or older pupils. The resource also supports the new Scottish National 3 and 4 Biology courses.

Teachers Guide 2

Over the past 10 years at SSERC we have been producing activities which help teachers to encourage meaningful discussion about scientific issues. One of the areas which we have been developing supports science and health issues such as Liver and Alcohol. These activities are based around a series of resources which were made possible with funding from the AstraZeneca Science Teaching Trust (now known as the Primary Science Teaching Trust).

 

The health of young people is of increasing concern to society, as a result of their lifestyle choices. Alcohol consumption in school children has doubled over a decade, and in 2005 a quarter of pupils imbibed 14 or more units a week. Teachers are discovering that younger and younger pupils are consuming alcohol, and the police report a steep rise in alcohol-related crime involving very young children.

 

We strongly recommend that initially you look through the Teacher Guide and then access the other files as required.  The complete  resource consists of 7 files and a series of 4 video clips; each of the files can be accessed by clicking on the links below:

 

 

B0006219

 

This activity provides teachers with a resource which supports (i) an understanding of stem cells, (ii) how they can be used therapeutically, and (iii) a discussion activity which raises some of the issues relating to stem cells. The original research and development for this resource was funded by the Wellcome Trust's 'Engaging Science Scheme'.

 

 

The resource supports CfE level 4 science outcomes and the stem cell outcomes from National 4 and 5 Biology.

 

The teacher guide gives more detailed information about the curriculum links. Additionally this activity supports the CfE principles and practice document which asks teachers to use activities which encourage young people to:

 

  • make informed personal decisions and choices
  • express opinions and show respect for others' views
  • develop informed social, moral and ethical views of scientific, economic and environmental issues
  • discuss and debate scientific ideas and issues.

 

We recommend that initially you look through the Teacher Guide and then access the other files as required. Files can be accessed from the links below:

 

Stem cell story Teacher guide Pupil sheet Pupil background information Help cards Picture cards

 

We have created a suite of reports about the use of stem cells.  The following are available:

 

 

Stem cell reports will be udpated on a regular basis. In due course an archive of past stories will be created.

Welcome to the SSERC physics pages.

Here you'll find links to our advice on physics health and safety matters and, in time, more and more resources to support the curriculum.

Remember that one of the Physics Team's key roles is to support you. Please get in touch if you have any queries about safe, exciting, reliable practical work, or any questions about equipment. We have a large archive of catalogues, manufacturers' leaflets, curriculum guides and so forth. SSERC also has a large equipment store. Often, we can help you get an experiment to work by mirroring it in our lab, finding the optimum settings, and sending you details. We look forward to hearing from you.

SSERC person (Gregor) on a daft wee bike

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If you use social media, you can "like" us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter.

www.facebook.com/SSERCphysics

www.twitter.com/SSERCphysics

 

              

 

 

 

SSERC has produced a number of resources which support aspects of the four mandatory Revised Higher Physics Units. Clicking on the links below will take you to a page where those resources can be accessed. :-

    The resources here target CfE level 3 and 4 Experiences and Outcomes. We haven't listed them by outcome because they tend to span different levels. Have a look in the N3,4,5 area too.

    Here are some resources we think will help support N3, 4 and 5 courses. Have a look at our CfE Level 3 and 4 pages as you might find ideas there for activities as well.

    Here are some resources we hope you will find useful for the current, revised and CfE Highers.

    We hope you will find the resources on this page useful for current, revised and CfE Advanced Higher courses.

    Our Various demos section lets you download a guide to some physics demonstrations. It also links to some videos we have hosted on the SSERCphysics Facebook page. The Apps List was compiled at the 2013 IoP/SSERC summer school. As a trial, we've hosted some "How to" videos that were designed to help technicians with little or no physics experience to set up common apparatus, as part of the Introductory Physics course. Others might find them useful too.

     

     

    Introduction

    Misunderstandings about the application of health and safety law have, in some cases, discouraged schools and teachers from carrying out a range of learning activities both inside and outside the classroom. These misunderstandings can also be fuelled by fears of civil action or concerns about the need for detailed paperwork.

    A proportionate approach to the management of health and safety risks in schools is about:

    • protecting pupils and staff from real harm
    • enabling innovation and learning opportunities to take place
    • helping those who create the risks to manage them sensibly and responsibly

    It's NOT about:

    • creating a totally risk free environment
    • stifling initiative and stopping learning activities where risks are managed
    • generating mountains of paperwork

     

    While it is certainly the case that science and technology activities in primary schools are generally far less hazardous that those in secondary schools, that does not mean there are no hazards to be considered.

    In addition, the younger pupils are often more at risk due to their age and inexperience than their older counterparts. Also, science and technology is often taught by teachers who do not have a background in the subject.

    Thus a source of reliable, easy to understand Health and Safety advice for primary schools is of the greatest importance. That is what these pages are for.

    Be SafeBe Safe! - The key document here is the ASE publication Be Safe! Every school should have at least one copy. If you don't have one, you can get them from the ASE online bookshop here.

    Red cabbageMany teachers are very wary about using chemicals with primary school pupils. It is, however, vitally important that pupils at this age begin to learn about the chemistry: after all, we are surrounded by chemicals: everything we eat and drink, paints and inks used in art, materials used in technology or for clothing and sports equipment. It is all chemistry.

    With a common sense approach and a few simple precautions there is a lot of excellent and safe practical work on chemistry that can be done at this level.

    Many household chemicals can be used to carry out chemistry activities.

    But just because something can be easily bought on the high street does not mean it is suitable for use in the classroom.

    As a rule of thumb - if you can do the same experiment with something safer, then you should.

    That is why we have produced these guidance pages so you can look up anything you might be concerned about and see what precautions to take. 

    We have consulted many sources but would like to pay particular tribute to the ASE publication 'Be Safe', a copy of which should be in every school.

    Whoosh BottleWelcome to the Chemistry home page.


    Using the links on your left, you can access all sorts of useful chemistry-related resources.

    Health and safety - This is the home of the latest incarnation of the Hazardous Chemical's manual. There is a large range of chemicals that are commonly encountered in school and for most of them you will be able to findd ata on the hazards associated with each chemical, information on how to handle, store and dispose of it, and what to do if you spill it or have an accident. You will also find information on a range of experimental procedures involving each chemical.

    CPD - Here you will find information on any chemistry-related CPD events on the horizon.

    Educational resources - The curriculum areas have now been properly organised with links to over 70 workshops and demonstrations either in a list or placed in the sections of the curriculum where we think they fit. If you think any are in the wrong place - or should be referenced elswhere as well, please let us know.

    The first tranche of resources has now been uploaded. You can find them by searching, by looking at the appropriate curriculum page or by clicking on the link above on the menu. They are classified according to the curriculum level we think they are most appropriate for: CfE, National 4&5, Higher, Advanced higher.

    Latest News:

    Details of the latest updates to the website are now in a table at the bottom of this page. Chemistry graphics (new)

    Social Media

    If you want to keep up with the thrill-a-minute ride that is a chemist's life in SSERC, we are now on:

    Facebook Twitter GIcon
       Facebook - Sserc chemistry           Twitter - @SSERCchemistry      

    Instagram -

    ssercchemistry

       Google + +SSERCchemistry     

     

    Date Update
    23rd August 2017 New page for Exemplar National 5 Assignments (http://www.sserc.org.uk/national-5/national-5-assignments)
    1st July 2017 We are now on Instagram too (well, have been for a while actually) @ssercchemistry  (web version here https://www.instagram.com/ssercchemistry/?hl=en
    3rd June 2017 New demonstration - An autocatalytic reaction.
    8th May 2017 Revised Safe Shelf Lives list - to resolve some differences with the individual data pages.
    7th September 2016 New article about gloves and allergies.
    22nd April 2016 Revised version of the Banned/Restricted chemicals list uploaded. No major changes but they are now combined into one list to make it a bit easier.
    22nd April 2016 A few small additions: Details of indicators for Silver titrations added to the silver and other precious metals uses page, details of indicators for dichromate titrations added to the dichromates uses page, details of a gaseous oscillating reaction added to the ammonium compounds uses page, recipe for bubble mix added to the alcohols (polyhydric) uses page, a recipe for sea water added to the sodium compounds uses page and recipes for hard water added to the calcium compounds uses page.
    15th April 2016 Revised all the online solution calculators so they don't open up in the wrong, usually blank, part of the spreadsheets  Added calculators for all three Organic Acid pages and for phosphates. Also added a Uses and Control Measures page for aliuphatic, monobasic organic acids - having apparently forgotten it!
    11th April 2016 Updated the page on Eye Protection. The guidance has not changed but I hope I've made it clearer and easier on the eye . . . so to speak.
    15th March 2016 Golden Rain demo uploaded. Also new data page produced for Heptane.
    29th October 2015 New resources (with accompanying videos) about Food Chemistry (Mainly for higher but possibly other areas too).
    16th September 2015 New Data page for EDTA and its salts, rather than being part of amines)
    15th Sept 2015 Long-awaited appearence of the (final draft of the) updated guide to Preparing Risk Assessments for Chemistry Project Work in Schools & Colleges. (It's only taken 25 years!)
    24th Aug 2015 New H&S page on iodic(v), bromic(V) and chloric(V) acids
    21st Aug 2015 New activity pH of the Planet - a simple technique using 2 indicators to determine the pH of different environmental water samples.
    12th Aug 2015 A whole new section in the resources part. All about microscale chemistry with 20 experiments and details on how to obtain and/or make some of the equipment needed. The landing page is here
    17th July 2015 Solution calculator added for Iron Compounds in the Uses and Control Measures menu.
    16th July 2015 Chip pan fire demo uploaded.
    10th July 2015 Sunscreens and cyanotypes uploaded - an experiment using a version of the cyanotype photographic process instead of uv beads to investigate sunscreens
    3rd July 2015 Demo of the real reactivity of aluminium uploaded - using mercurt II chloride solution to remove the oxide layer.
    3rd June 2015 New activity to build a smartphone spectroscope. and analyse the photos online.
    29th April 2015 New Hazards page for Biochemicals - Oils, fats & waxes.
    29th April 2015 New Hazards page for Biochemicals - proteins (other) - albumen, casein etc.
    28th April 2015 The concentration calculators have been combined into a single spreadsheet that can be downloaded from here.
    8th April 2015 Some new short experiment added. An easy one on Azo-dyes, A method for extraction oil from coffee grounds (well, oily terpenes) and some simple. fun experiments about cross-linking of latex to make rubber balls and bands.
    7th April 2015 All Demos and Short experiments updated with references now to CfE Higher/Advanced Higher rather than Revised.
    10th February 2015 New page on Hazardous Chemicals about amides.
    5th February 2015 Uploaded Ligands of copper compounds. A series of ligands displace each other from copper in solution.
    4th November 2014 Uploaded Acid Rain in the Classroom - a simple safe activity to show how CO2, NO2 and SO2 can cause acid rain.
    30th October 2014 Ghost metal demonstration uploaded.
    7th October 2014 New workshop on Food Forensics - Various types of chromatography used in extraction and analysis of colours.
    26th September 2014 New activities for Terpenes, mainly aimed at the Fragrances section of new higher, uploaded
    10th September 2014 New pages for buffer solutions. The Uses & Control Measures page includes pleanty of recipes, including several online calculators to enable calculation of particular volumes of buffers of specific pH
    1st September 2014 New pages added to include precious metals (gold, platinum etc) and other metals (gallium, cerium and tantalum etc) and some of their compounds
    19th August 2014 Added Magneson I and Magneson II to the indicators page
    15th Aug 2014 Uploaded CfE Higher assignment activities (not yet SQA approved but what the hell) for biodiesel, enthalpy, vitamin C and water analysis.
    18th July 2014 Cyanotype activity uploaded. The first thing I did for the bulletin at SSERC and only now put on the website - for shame!
    17th July 2014 Silver nitrate page expanded to include other silver compounds as well as a few other rare metals.
    16th July 2014 New pages for amines
    14th July 2014 Esters pages updated and split into aromatic esters and aliphatic esters
    11th July 2014 New pages for amino acids and nucleic acids & their bases
    8th July 2014 New pages produced for molybdenum & compounds (including molybdates) and strontium compounds.
    8th July 2014 Installed an index for all the chemicals to make it easier to find indicators and other reagents. You can also use it to find background information.
    12th June 2014 Colour change chameleon -  An attractive reaction that passes through several of the different coloured oxidation states of manganese. (AH)
    8th June 2014 Improved the SEARCH facility so it is actually possible to find things.
    22nd May 2014 Added recipes for artificial urine to a new page - Biochemicals - (Misc)
    3rd April 2014 Added new pages (data and uses) for miscellaneous esters
    2nd April 2014 Added a new page for redox and compleximetric indicators.
    1st April 2014 Revamped the pH indicators page and added a few new ones (crystal violet, indigo carmine, m-cresol purple, methyl yellow and Nile blue)
    31st March 2014 New entry for 1,2-dibromo, dichloro and diiodo ethanes
    31st March 2014 New entry for benzonitrile.
    30th March 2014 Thanks to Ian for uploading a whole load of chemistry graphics here.
    27th March 2014 5 demonstration added to the demos section: Aluminium / iodine reaction, Ammonia fountain, Ammonium dichromate volcano, Hot ice (supersaturated sodium ethanoate) and a photochemical blue bottle
    17th March 2014 Added the Finding an Equilibrium Constant workshop to the resources page. (It was under the new higher but had been missed off here)
    17th March 2014 New CfE Advanced Higher pages are now live. Short on resources at the moment but there is time!
    14th march 2014 Added microelectrolysis to the Other Chemical Reactions section.
    13th March 2014 Added to the Demonstrations. Oxidation States of Manganese and Oxidations States of Vanadium
    11th March 2014 New CfE Higher page is put back up - after doing it 2 weeks ago but losing everything when the website crashed!
    17th February 2014 Hydrogels workshop updated with 2 new activities and powerpoint made available for download.
    5th February 2014 Northern Lights demonstration (reactivity of aluminium) added to Demonstrations page
    3rd February 2014 U&CM pages now present for other alcohols: diols, polyols etc.
    22nd January 2014 Data Pages added for other alcohols: diols, polyols etc.
    14th January 2014 U&CM pages now present for Organic Acids
    8th January 2014 Interactive calculators now on all (almost) the U&CM pages for chemicals that are commonly made up into solutions.
    19th December 2013 Colourful catalysis added to the demonstrations section. Catalysis of reaction between sodium thiosulphate and hydrogen peroxide.
    16th December 2013 Thermit added into the Demonstrations section - having been inexplicably omitted several months ago (is there a theme developing here?)
    12th December 2013 Just realised I had not mentioned the new pages for organic acids that went up several weeks ago! (Aliphatic monobasic, aliphatic polybasic and aromatic)
    5th December 2013 New Chemistry Risk Assessment page produced which includes links to all the risk assessment for chemistry activities
    27th November 2013 Index for background info updated to include storage, which had been inexplicably omitted.
    22nd November 2013 Index created for Background Info section (Well, a contents page that calls itself an index)
    15th November 2013 All entries for Uses and Control measures by use completed (All 2,700 of them!)
    28th October 2013 Concentration 'timelines' complete for all substances soluble in water.
    21st October 2013 Entry for cobalt & compounds updated to include ethanoate and thiocyanate
    18th October 2013 More concentration 'timelines
    16th October 2013 New page for Chromates(VI), separate from dichromates
    15th October 2013 Further corrections and clarifications on U & CM pages.
    10th October 2013 Northern Lights demonstration uploaded.
    8th October 2013 Various corrections and clarifications on U & CM pages - part of an ongoing listing of them all to revise the 'By Use - menu.
    8th October 3013 New Water Testing workshop uploaded
    4th October 2013 Indicators page updated with a few new entries and a clearer layout.
    4th October 2013 New D&RM and U&CM pages now live for many lower hazard substances: aluminium compounds, ammonium compounds, calcium compounds, magnesium compounds, phosphates, potassium compounds and sodium compounds
    3rd october 2013 Concentration 'timelines' added for benzene-(1,4),(1,3) & (1,2)-diamine
    2nd October 2013
     The Hydrogen Sulphates (sodium and potassium) page has moved to sulphates, sulphites etc, sodium & potassium and has been expanded to include many other sodium and potassium sulpites and similar compounds.
    30th September 2013 Sodium bismuthate added to Bismuth metal and compounds
    26th September 2013 Quick Links placed on the Chemistry Health and Safety homepage so you can find details of things like eye protection more easily.

     

    chemistry1 1Welcome to the New CfE Higher Chemistry Page.

    We have made a start uploading resources for experimental work that could help to support teaching of the course. And don't worry there's quite a bit more to come.

    The resources are accessed from the unit pages which you can get to from the links below.

    Alternatively you can use the search facility or you can find a list of all the chemistry resources here.

    If you think activities of ours are of use in areas of the course we have not mentioned, please let us know so we can add the information in.

    Chemical change and structure

    Chemistry in society

    Nature's Chemistry

    Researching chemistry

    This unit deals with a lot of organic chemistry, in particular the chemistry of compounds found and used in food and a variety of consumer products.


    Use the links below to find the resources you are looking for:

    1) Esters, fats and oils

    Esters - naming, structural formulae and uses.

    Esters condensation and hydrolysis reactions.

    Food Science - A series of reactions, one of which is a simple method of making small samples of a few esters..

    Finding an Equilibrium Constant - An Advanced higher activity but it is an experiment to make esters and so could be used here.

    Biodiesel  - A range of investigations based around the production and testing of Biodiesel from vegetable oil

    Fats and oils

    Saturated and unsaturated fats and oils.

    Melting points of oils and fats, through intermolecular bonding.

    2) Proteins

    Enzymes as biological catalysts: amino acids and dietary proteins.

    Enzymic browning - An investigation into the enzyme catalysed browning of apples.

    Condensation reactions to make proteins: amide link & peptide link.

    Digestion, enzyme hydrolysis of dietary proteins.

    3) Chemistry of cooking

    Flavours in foods.

    Maillard Reactions - Maillard reactions are responsible for many colours and flavours in foods - this quick and simple experiment demonstrates some of these.

    Influence of functional groups on solubility, boiling points and volatility.

    Aldehydes as sources of flavour and aroma.

    Aldehydes and ketones, straight and branch chained, systematic names, structural formulae and isomers. (for compounds with no more than eight carbon atoms in their longest chain.)

    Oxidation reactions of aldehydes and ketones.

    Silver mirror (Demo)Ammoniacal silver nitrate is prepared and this is reduced in a flask by a reducing sugar or aldehyde leading to a coating of silver on its inside.

    Effect of heat on proteins, denaturation of proteins.

    4) Oxidation of food

    Alcohols, branch chained, systematic names, structural formulae and isomers. (for compounds with no more than eight carbon atoms in their longest chain.)

    Hydrogen bonding. - diol, triols and the effect of hydrogen bonding on properties of these molecules.

    Primary, secondary and tertiary alcohols, oxidation reactions and products, oxidising agents.

    Carboxylic acids, branch chained, systematic names, structural formulae and isomers.

    Reactions of carboxylic acids to include reduction and reactions with bases to form salts.

    Reaction of oxygen with edible oils.

    Oxidative Rancidity - A simple investigation into the oxidation of fats.

    Antioxidants. Ion-electron equations for the oxidation of antioxidants.

    Colourless orange or blue (Demo) - A demo version of the Briggs-Rauscher reaction as used in the antioxidants workshop.

    Antioxidants  - This is a range of investigations based around the Briggs-Rauscher oscillating reaction to look at antioxidant levels in fruits and teas (though the method can be adapted for any source of antioxidants).

    Vitamin C in Vegetables - Activity to determine the concentration of Vitamin C in fruit and vegetables by titration against DCPIP

    5) Soaps, detergents and emulsions

    Hydrolysis of esters. Structure of soap ions including covalent tail, (hydrophobic), and an ionic head (hydrophilic)

    Cleansing action of soaps.

    Production, action and use of detergents.

    Emulsion and emulsifiers and their formation and use in food.

    Emulsions - A simple investigation into emulsions and emulsifiers.

    6) Fragrances

    Essential oils from plants: properties, uses and products.

    Oranges are the only fruitshampoo - An activity involving (amongst other things) the extraction of D-limonene from orange peel

    Terpenes: functional group, structure and use.

    Terpenes - A series of activities looking at terpenes

    Oxidation of terpenes within plants.

    7) Skin care

    The damaging effect of ultraviolet radiation (UV) in sunlight on skin and the action of sun-block.

    Sunscreens and Cyanotypes - An adaptation of the historic cyanotype photographic process to enable quantitative investigation of uv in sunlight and the effect of sunscreens.

    Formation of free radicals in UV light.

    Structure, reactivity and reactions of free radicals.

    Free radical scavengers in cosmetic products, food products and plastics.

    Reaction of free radical scavengers with free radicals to prevent chain reactions

    Lip Balm - Pupils design and make their own lip balm product. (This doesn't fit exactly into any subcategory but perhaps a choice of a uv absorber could tie it in to this section)

     


    Use the links below to find the resources you are looking for:

    1) Controlling the rate

    Collision theory explaining rates of reaction and activation energy.

    Light sticks (Demo) - using the chemicals from commercially available light sticks (or glow sticks) to carry out a reaction investigating the effect of temperature on a chemical reaction

    Rhubarb, rhubarb, rhubarb (Demo) - Using a stick of rhubarb to stir a beaker of dilute potassium manganate VII, the solution goes clear.

    Rhubarb Rhubarb - A pupil experiment version of the same reaction as above.

    Thiosulphate acid reaction - microscale - A small scale version of the classic rate of reaction experiment.

    Relative rate of reaction

    Reaction profiles Potential energy diagrams, energy pathways, activated complex, activation energy and enthalpy changes.

    Bleaching Blue Food Dye - Reaction to determine rate constant and order of reaction from the bleaching of blue food colouring by domestic bleach. (Aimed at Advanced higher but easily adapted)

    Catalysts Reaction pathway, activation energy.

    Cannon fire (Demo) - Potassium manganate VII catalyses breakdown of hydrogen peroxide mixed with ethanol. Burning ethanol/peroxide is quiet but loud bangs appear on addition of parmanganate

    Catalyst at work (Demo) - Rochelle Salt and hydrogen peroxide, catalysed by cobalt chloride, shows a different colour intermediate complex

    Elephant's Toothpaste (Demo) - Classic demonstration showing hydrogen peroxide decomposing due to catalysis by potassium iodide.

    Genie in a Bottle (Demo) - another demonstration of the catalytic breakdown of hydrogen peroxide.

    Colourful catalysis (Demo) - a visually attractive and colourful reaction between sodium thiosulfate and hydrogen peroxide in the presence of universal indicator.

     

    Temperature and kinetic energy Energy distribution diagrams showing effect of temperature changes on successful collisions. The effect of temperature on the reaction rate

    Rhubarb Rhubarb - A workshop using rhubarb to decolourise permanganate in order to follow the rate of reaction, looking at concentration and surface area (and possibly temperature).

    Thiosulphate acid reaction - microscale - a small scale procedure for investigation into the factors affecting rate of reaction..

    2) Periodicity

    The first 20 elements in the Periodic Table are categorised according to bonding and structure.

    Silicon and silanes from sand (Demo) - Making silicon and silanes from the reaction between magnesium and silicon dioxide

    Periodic trends and underlying patterns and principles.

    Covalent radius, ionisation energy, electronegativity and trends in groups and periods, related to atomic structure.

    3) Structure and bonding

    Bonding continuum

    Polar covalent bonds and their position on the bonding continuum, dipole formation and notation. δ+ δ-, eg H δ+ Clδ-

    Intermolecular forces called van de Waals forces. London dispersion forces, permanent dipole-dipole, hydrogen bonding and the resulting physical properties including solubility.

    Polymer Slime - Making slime from borax and PVA glue - and looking at the properties and the composition varies. (Mainly aimed at lower down the school but can be a fun introduction).

    Hydrogels - A series of experiments on hydrogels and their properties.

    Amazing Penny Experiment - A simple experiment to investigate surface tension.

     

     

    Use the links below to find the resources you are looking for:

    Getting the most from reactants

    availability, sustainability and cost of feedstock(s); opportunities for recycling; energy requirements; marketability of by-products; product yield.

    Balanced equations, mole ratio(s) of reactants and products.

    Determination of quantities of reactants and/or products using balanced equation, the gram formula masses (GFM), mass and moles.

    Magnesium Burning - Using bottle tops held with wire instead of a crucible. Mass is measured before and after.

    Determination of quantities of reactants and/or products using balanced equations, concentrations and volumes of solutions and/or masses of solutes.

    Calculations of mass or volume ( for gases) of products, assuming complete conversion of reactants.

    Percentage yield and atom economy.

    Biodiesel - A range of investigations based around the production and testing of Biodiesel from vegetable oil.

    Rocks to Riches - analysis of copper content of 'ores' followed by extraction of copper by leaching and electrowinning.

    Limiting reactants and excesses identified

    Equilibria

    Reversible reactions, dynamic equilibrium, altering equilibrium position.

    Equilibrium and Le Chatelier (Demo) - the effect of temperature on equilibrium - colour changes of the octahedral hexaaquocobalt (II) cation and the tetrahedral tetrachlorocobaltate (II) anion

    Effect of catalyst on equilibrium and the most favourable reaction conditions.

    Chemical energy

    Enthalpy calculations used for industrial processes The specific heat capacity, mass temperature and moles used to calculate the enthalpy change for a reaction. Enthalpies of combustion.

    Dynamite soap (Demo) - Exploding hydrogen/oxygen bubbles generated by electrolysis of water

    Biodiesel - A range of investigations based around the production and testing of Biodiesel from vegetable oil. Includes determination of enthalpy.

    Biodiesel - A range of investigations based around the production and testing of Biodiesel from vegetable oil. Calculations of bond energies of oil and biodiesel can be done to compare heat output as above

    Hess's law. Calculation of enthalpy changes by application of Hess's law.

    Bond enthalpies for a diatomic molecule

    The molar bond enthalpy and mean molar bond enthalpies. Enthalpy changes for gas phase reactions can be calculated using bond enthalpies.

    Oxidising or reducing agents

    Elements, molecules, group ions and compounds as oxidising and reducing agents, electrochemical series as reduction reactions.

    Growing silver trees (Demo) - a displacement reaction with copper wite and silver nitrate that produces dentritic crystals of metallic silver.

    Blue Bottle (Demo) - Methylene blue is reduced to a colourless form in alkaline solutionj by a reducing sugar. Shaking the bottle allows oxygen to reverse this.

    Fire writing (Demo) - Draw a trail on filter paper with sodium nitrate and dry it. Then light end of the trail and fire will smoulder its way along the route.

    Genie in a bottle (Demo) - exothermic catalytic decomposition of hydrogen peroxide by potassium iodide

    Hot Stuff (Demo) - spontaneous reaction between propan-1,2,3-triol (glycerol) and potassium manganate VII.

    Screaming jelly baby (Demo) - Molten potassium chlorate V causes rapid combustion of sugar in a jelly baby.

    Traffic lights (Demo) - a variant on the blue bottlle reaction

     Uses of oxidising agents.

    Ion-electron for redox, oxidation and reduction equations.

    Chemical analysis

    Chromatography - Uses of chromatography.

    (son of) Flash Chromatography - Flash chromatography carried out in a syringe can be used to separate samples of food dyes or plant pigments.

    Differences in the polarity and/or size of molecules

    Volumetric titration - Volumetric analysis for quantitative reactions. Standard solutions, acid base and redox titrations.

    Vitamin C Drops Determining the concentration of Vitamin C in a a variety of fruit juices using a simple titration with iodine.

    Vitamin C in Vegetables - Determining the concentration of Vitamin C in a vegetables by titration with DCPIP.

    Biodiesel - A range of investigations based around the production and testing of Biodiesel from vegetable oil. It includes a back titration with sodium thiosulphate to determine the iodine number.

     

     

    QuantitativeBenedicts"The Researching Chemistry unit allows learners to develop key skills of scientific investigation, and then to apply these skills when carrying out an open-ended investigation into a topical issue in chemistry."

    As such it is ideal preparation for the Advanced Higher project.


    At the moment there are two exemplar researching chemistry units:

    Alcohol

    Antioxidants

    On the pages linked to, you can find the original LTS/ES materials as well as suporting material SSERC has developed.

    It was envisaged that there be a third, biodiesel, but that seemed to go missing in mysterious circumstances. It may yet resurface - watch this space.

    August 2014

    SSERC was commissioned by SQA to produce some more exemplars for the Higher Assignment. We delegated the task and the three activities, along with an updated version of the fabled biodiesel exemplar, have been sent to SQA for inspection.

    While there may be a few changes needed, we though it might be usefyul for you to see the sorts of things that have been produced so here are the links. Remember - these are not (as yet) approved activities.

    Biodiesel

    Enthalpy

    Vitamin C

    Water analysis

     

    national 4 chemistryWelcome to the National 4 Chemistry page.

    We have made a start uploading resources for experimental work that could help to support teaching of the course. Don't worry there's quite a bit more to come.

    The resources are accessed from the unit pages which you can get to from the links below.

    Alternatively you can use the search facility or you can find a list of all the resources here.

     

     

    The key areas covered in this Unit are:

    rates of reaction — following the rate of a reaction

    Colourless orange or blue (Demo) - A demonstration version of the Briggs-Rauscher reaction - as used in antioxidants workshop.

    Rhubarb, Rhubarb, Rhubarb (Demo) - Stirriing a beaker of dilute potassium manganate VII, the solution goes clear.

    Antioxidants  - This is a range of investigations based around the Briggs-Rauscher oscillating reaction to look at antioxidant levels in fruits and teas (though the method can be adapted for any source of antioxidants).

    Rhubarb Rhubarb - An investigation following on from the demo above, Using rhubarb decolourising permanganate to follow the rate of reaction, looking at concentration and surface area (and perhaps temparature)

     

    atomic structure and bonding related to properties of materials — basic atomic structure including electron arrangement; covalent bonding as electron sharing and ionic bonding of electron transfer; physical properties of substances linked to bonding, chemical formulae of two element compounds; symbol equations from word equations

     

    energy changes of chemical reactions — recognising and uses of exothermic and endothermic reactions

    Cool Experiment (Demo) - The classic endothermic reaction between barium hydroxide and ammonium thiocyanate.

    Genie in a Bottle (Demo) - Exothermic decomposition of hydrogen peroxide by potassium iodide.

    Hot Stuff (Demo) - The spontaneous exothermic reaction between propan-1,2,3-triol (glycerol) and potassium manganate VII

    Light Sticks (Demo) - Using light sticks to show how temperature affects the rate of reaction (this can be done as a class experiment instead of a demonstration).

    Methane Bags (Demo) - Burning bags with different ratios of methane:oxygen in them.

    Methane Bubbles (Demo) - Preparing and igniting bubbles of methane.

    Methane Tin (Demo) - Using old coffee tin with methane flame from hole in top. Air comes in and eventually you get the right ratio for an explosion.

    Non-Burning £5 note (Demo) - Burn a note in a ethanol/water mixture. The water keeps it cool enough not to burn.

    When a fossil fuel burns (Demo) - Classic demonstration, collection of water and carbon dioxidewhen a Bunsen burns

    Whoosh bottle (Demo) - Ignition of alcohol vapour in a 15l water bottle to produce a spectacular 'whoosh'.

    Biodiesel - A range of investigations based around the production and testing of Biodiesel from vegetable oil.

     

    acids and bases — the effect of soluble oxides on the pH of water; soluble oxides and their environmental impact of non-metal oxide; uses of acids in food and drink and their impact on health; selection of chemicals for salt formation

    Colourful Flowers (Demo) - Make paper 'flowers' soaked in different buffer solutions. Then spray indicator on and you get different colour flowers.

    Law of similar shapes (Demo) - A series of simple 'trick' reactions involving acids, bases and phenolphthalein.

    Rainbow reaction (Demo) - Form a rainbow of colours to illustrate pH scale with HCl and sodium carbonate along the length of a burette

    Spell casting (Demo) - Clear liquid poured into beakers with tiny amounts of acids/bases in - fails to change colour until the last one - phenolphthalein indicator

    Vinegar Cheats: Using a simple titration (with pipettes) to find out which samples of vinegar have been watered down.

    The key areas covered in this Unit are:

    metals and alloys — reactivity series, reactions of metals, corrosion, physical and chemical protection of metals, electrochemical series and electrochemical cells, voltage and electroplating, extraction of metals displacement reactions, composition, uses and physical properties of alloys

    Coca-cola powered clock (Demo) - Different metals to generate electricity using coke as the electrolyte (could be done as a class experiment)

    Electroplating faces (Demo) - nickel plating of a copper coin.

    Growing Silver Trees (Demo) - Displacement reactions producing dendritic crystals of silver.

    Turning copper coins into silver and gold (Demo) - Zinc plating a copper coin with sodium zincate and then heating it to make brass

    Salt and Battery: Use of fruit juices and different metal electrodes to generate an electric current.

    Copper Etching - Use of a displacement reaction to etch a zinc plate and use it for printing

    Plastic Fantastic - Synthesis and testing of an electrically conductive plastic - polypyrrole.

     

    materials — polymers, monomers, name of polymers, thermosoftening and thermosetting plastics, properties, uses and combustion of plastics, biodegradable plastics; advantages and disadvantages of natural versus synthetic polymers, ceramic materials properties and uses; development of new materials unique properties; reuse and recycle materials

    Dehydrated snow (Demo) - Absorption of water by sodium polyacrylate hydrogel.

    Disappearing Water (Demo) - Absorption of water by sodium polyacrylate hydrogel

    Gloopy and gooey (Demo) - two related experiments - Gaviscon in copper sulphate solution and PVA/Borax - both cross-linking polymers (could be done as class experiments)

    Smart Materials: Some short activities involving commercially available smart chemical materials.

    Polymer Slime: Making slime from borax and PVA glue - and looking at the properties as the composition varies.

     

    fertilisers — plant nutrients and elements, natural and synthetic fertiliser

     

    nuclear chemistry — formation of elements and background radiation

     

    chemical analysis — qualitative analysis of the environment including pH, and flame testing

    Flame colours (Demo) - using atomiser bottles to carry out flame tests (can be done as a class experiment)

    The key areas covered in this Unit are:

    fuels — formation and extraction processes for crude oil; the use of fuels and their environmental impact on the carbon cycle, and alternative energy sources including biomass

    Dynamite soap (Demo) - exploding bubbles of hydrogen and oxygen produced by electrolysis of water.

    Methane bubbles (Demo) - Preparing and igniting bubbles of methane.

    Piezo rockets (Demo) - preparing and firing mini pipette rockets containing hydrogen (or possibly another flammable gas)

    Whoosh bottle (Demo) - Ignition of alcohol vapour in a 15l water bottle to produce a spectacular 'whoosh'.

    Dye Sensitised Solar Cells: An activity to show generation of electricity from plant pigments.

     

    hydrocarbons — fractional distillation and cracking, straight chained alkanes (C1–C8), alkenes (C2–C8), their physical, chemical properties, general formulae, structural formulae and uses; unsaturated and saturated hydrocarbons

     

    everyday consumer products — alcoholic drinks: sources and production, units in drinks and health issues, analysis of carbohydrates, Benedict’s and iodine solutions; solubility of carbohydrates; competing demands for carbohydrates as food or fuel

     

    plants to products — practical-based activity on products derived from plants which have enhanced everyday life

    Shampoo: Activity to make shampoo, involving steam distillation to extract natural essences from plants

    Lip Balm: Activities researching and then making lip balms using many plant-based products.

    Flash Chromatography;  can be used to separate samples of food dyes (pure samples or extracted from sweets) or plant pigments.

    Vitamin C Drops: Ascorbic acid is added to many doods as a preservative. This easy practical estimates the content in a variety of fruit juices.

    Biodiesel: An investigation intothe production and testing of Biodiesel from vegetable oil

    chemistry2 1Welcome to the National 5 chemistry page.

    We have made a start uploading resources for experimental work that could help to support teaching of the course.

    The resources are accessed from the unit pages which you can get to from the links below.

    Alternatively you can use the search facility or you can find a list of all the resources here.

    The key areas covered in this Unit are:

    rates of reaction — average rate of reaction calculated from graph to show change in rate as reaction progresses

    Colourless orange or blue (Demo) - a demo version of the Briggs-rauscher reaction as used in the antioxidants workshop.

    Cool experiment (Demo) - endothermic reaction between barium hydroxide and ammonium thiocyanate.

    Light sticks (Demo) - Effect of temperature on luminosity of glow-sticks (this can also be done as a class experiment)

    Rhubarb, Rhubarb, Rhubarb (Demo) - Using a stick of rhubarb to stir a beaker of dilute potassium manganate VII, the solution goes clear.

    Antioxidants  - This is a range of investigations based around the Briggs-Rauscher oscillating reaction to look at antioxidant levels in fruits and teas (though the method can be adapted for any source of antioxidants).

    Bleaching Blue Food Dye - Reaction to determine rate constant and order of reaction from the bleaching of blue food colouring by domestic bleach. (Workshop is aimed at Advance Higher but without the mathematics it can easily be adapted to this level).

    Rhubarb Rhubarb - Using rhubarb to decolourise permanganate in order to follow the rate of reaction, looking at concentration and surface area (and possibly temperature)

     

    atomic structure and bonding related to properties of materials — nuclide notation; isotopes and relative atomic mass; ions and ionic bonding; covalent molecular; covalent network and ionic lattices; physical properties of chemicals explained through bonding; chemical and ionic formulae including group ions

     

    formulae and reaction quantities — balanced equations; gram formula mass, the mole, calculations relating mass, volume of solutions, concentration and moles

     

    acids and bases — dissociation of water into hydrogen and hydroxide ions; pH is related to the concentration of hydrogen and hydroxide ions in pure water, acids and alkalis; neutralisation titration

    Colourful flowers (Demo) - Make paper 'flowers' soaked in different buffer solutions. Then spray indicator on and you get different colour flowers.

    Rainbow reaction (Demo) - Form a rainbow of colours to illustrate the pH scale with HCl and sodium carbonate along the length of a burette

    Conductivity - Activity using a (home made) conductivity flask to follow neutralisation reactions.

    The key areas covered in this Unit are:

    metals — metallic bonding and resulting electrical conductivity; balanced ionic equations for reactions of metals, extraction of metals and reduction reactions; electrochemical cells including a non-metal electrode; reactions of metals — electrons flow, redox reaction, oxidation, reduction, fuel cells and rechargeable batteries

    Salt and Battery - Use of fruit juices and different metal electrodes to investigate electrochemical cells.

     

    properties of plastics — addition and condensation polymerisation including polythene and polyesters; representation of the structure of monomers and polymers, natural polymers

    Gloopy and gooey (Demo) - two experiments: Gaviscon in copper sulphate and PVA/Borax, both cross-linking polymers cross-linking polymers

    Plastic Fantastic - Synthesis and testing of an electrically conductive plastic - polypyrrole

     

    fertilisers — the Haber process, commercial production of nitrate fertilisers, percentage mass compositions of fertilisers

     

    nuclear chemistry — radiation process, alpha, beta and gamma radiation; specific properties mass, charge and ability to penetrate different materials; nuclear equations; uses of radioactive isotopes; half-life; use of isotopes to date materials

     

    chemical analysis —techniques for monitoring the environment and methods for reducing pollution and titration with calculations

    Flame colours (Demo) - Using atomiser bottles for flame tests. (can perhaps be done as a class experiment)

     

     

    adrevised higher chemistryWelcome to the New CfE Advanced Higher page.

    We have made a start uploading resources for experimental work that could help to support teaching of the course. Don't worry there's quite a bit more to come.

    The resources are accessed from the unit pages which you can get to from the links below.

    Alternatively you can use the search facility or you can find a list of all the chemistry resources here.

    If you think activities of ours are of use in areas of the course we have not mentioned, please let us know so we can add the information in.

    Use the links below to find the resources you need:

    1 Electromagnetic radiation and atomic spectra

    Electromagnetic radiation and atomic spectra, Electromagnetic waves The relationship c = f λ

    DVD Spectroscope - Construction of a DVD spectroscope and analysis of spectra using tracker.

    Update - The link above now also has a method to produce a spectroscope attachment for a cameraphone and allow it to be uploaded to the web and interpreted.

    Dual nature of electromagnetic radiation — waves and particles  The relationships E=hf and E=Lhf

    Atomic emission: Evaluation of evidence for energy levels in atoms of elements

     Flame Colours - A series of simple methods to carry out flame tests.

    Atomic spectroscopy: Atomic emission spectroscopy and atomic absorption spectroscopy and how they are used to identify and quantify the elements present in a sample

     

    2 Atomic orbitals electronic configurations and the Periodic Table

    The four quantum numbers used to describe any electron within an atom. The shapes of s, p and d orbitals.

    Electronic configuration including: aufbau principle, Hund's rule, Pauli exclusion principle

    The Periodic Table is subdivided corresponding to electron configurations 

     

     

    3 Shapes of Molecules and Polyatomic Ions

    VSEPR rules. Apply VSEPR rules to determine shapes of molecules and polyatomic ions

     

    4 Transition metals


    Electronic configuration of transition metal atoms and ions and the anomalies of the model explained

    Oxidation numbers of transition metal ions. Using changes in oxidation number of transition metal ions to determine whether oxidation or reduction has occurred.

    Oxidation States of Vanadium - an experiment to demonstrate all 4 oxidation states of vanadium.

    Oxidation States of manganese - a demonstration of all the oxidation states of manganese from II to VII.

    Colour change chameleon - An attractive reaction that passes through several of the different coloured oxidation states of manganese.

    Iron Drops - a series of drop-scale reactions investigating a variety of reactions of Iron II and Iron III.

    Ligands. Bonding of ligands in transition metal complexes, Classification of ligands, Coordination number, Naming complex ions according to IUPAC rules

    Copper amino complexes - This practical involves the preparation of 2 isomers of copper and glycine and goes on to examine them by means of infra-red spectroscopy.

    Ligands of copper complexes - In a series of reactions, different ligands displace each other from complexes with copper.

    UV and visible absorption of transition metal complexes

    Catalysis by transition metals

    Catalyst at work (Demo) - Rochelle Salt and hydrogen peroxide, catalysed by cobalt schloride, shows the formation of a different coloured temporary intermediate.

     

    Acids and bases

    Ionic product of water and calculations of pH.  pH = –log10 [H+],  Kw = [H+] [OH-]

    Bronsted-Lowry acids/bases: definitions, pH of salt solutions, Equilibria of the salt solutions

    Strong and weak acids and bases. Properties of strong and weak acids and bases. the acid dissociation constant, Ka

    Calculation of pH for a weak acid

    Buffer solutions: Composition of a buffer, how buffers work and calculation of the pH of buffers pH = pKa–log10[acid/salt]

    Indicators: Weak acid indicators. selection of an appropriate indicator for a particular reaction based on titration curves. Colour change of a weak acid indicators

    Indicators - microscale - A series of small scale investigations into indicators.

    Rainbow reaction (Demo) - Form a rainbow of colours to illustrate the pH scale with hydrochloric acid and sodium carbonate along the length of a burette.

     

    Reaction feasibility

    Standard enthalpy of formation, definitions and relevant calculations. ΔHof = ΣΔHof (products) – ΣΔHof (reactants).

    Entropy and prediction of value of entropy. Changes of entropy

    Second and Third Laws of Thermodynamics

    Calculations in changes in standard entropy ΔSo = ΣΔSo(products) – ΣΔSo (reactants).

    Free energy: The concept of free energy. ΔG = ΔH –TΔS. Calculation of standard free energy change for a reaction. ΔGº = Σ ΔGº(products) –ΣΔGº(reactants)

    Applications of the concept of free energy Prediction of the feasibility of a chemical reaction under standard and non-standard conditions ΔGo = ΔHo – TΔSo

     

    Kinetics

    Determination of the order of a reaction (0,1,2,3) from experimental data and rate equations. Calculation of rate constants and units of k. rate = k[A]

    Bleaching Blue Food Dye - An experiment using cheap reagents (blue food dye and bleach) to determine the rate constant and order of a bleaching reaction.

    Reaction mechanisms. The rate determining step in a reaction. From the rate equation predict the rate determining step and possible mechanism.

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Use the links below to find the resources you need:

    Molecular orbitals

    Formation of bonding molecular orbitals.

    Hybridisation sp3, sp2 hybrid orbitals and their role in the formation of sigma and pi bonds.

    The bonding continuum. The symmetry and position of bonding orbitals between atoms determines types of bonding Ionic, polar and non-polar covalent bonding

     

    Molecular structure

    Convertion between molecular, structural and skeletal formulae with no more than 10 carbon atoms in their longest chain.

     

    Stereochemistry

    Stereoisomerism.

    Geometric isomerism cis and trans. Physical and chemical properties of geometric isomers.

    Copper amino complexes - preparation of cis and trans isomers of a copper-glycine complex.

    Optical isomerism. Non-superimposable mirror image, chiral/enantiomers. Racemic mixture and effect on polarised light. Physical and chemical properties of optical isomers.

    Food Science - The link 'Structural sublety' has a simple example of the enantiomers of carvone

     

    Synthesis

    From given equations identify: substitution, addition, elimination, condensation, hydrolysis, oxidation, reduction reactions Devise synthetic routes, with no more than three steps, from a given reactant to a final product  Deduce possible reactions from molecular structures

    Bond fission. Homolytic and heterolytic fission.

    Electrophiles and nucleophiles. Reactions involving heterolytic bond fission. Nucleophiles or electrophiles as attacking groups.

    Curly arrow notation. Use of double-headed and single-headed arrows to show electron movement. The curly arrow shows source and destination of the electron (s).

    Haloalkanes. Classification of monohaloalkanes as primary, secondary or tertiary. Monohaloalkanes undergo nucleophilic substitution reactions: alkalis to form alcohols, alcoholic alkoxides to form ethers, ethanolic cyanide to form nitriles which can be hydrolysed to carboxylic acids. Monohaloalkanes can also undergo elimination.reactions to form alkenes.

    The reaction mechanism for SN1 and SN2 reactions. SN1 and SN2 reactions using curly arrows and mechanisms with particular attention given to the transition state/intermediate.

    The preparation properties, and reactions of alcohols. Preparation from alkenes haloalkanes and reduction of carbonyl compounds using lithium aluminium hydride. Physical properties related to bonding. Dehydration, reaction with metals. Reactions with carboxylic acids and acid chlorides

    Finding an Equilibrium Constant  - An experiment to to determine experimentally the equilibrium constant for the reaction between methanol and ethanoic acid to form the ester methyl ethanoate. 

    Ethers. Naming and general structure. Boiling point related to bonding. Preparation using haloalkanes with alkoxides. Chemical and physical properties of ethers linked to molecular size and uses.

    Alkenes. Preparation: dehydration of alcohols, base-induced elimination of hydrogen halides from monohaloalkanes.  Electrophilic addition reactions: catalytic addition of hydrogen to form alkanes, including mechanisms for addition of halogens to form dihaloalkanes, addition of hydrogen halides according to Markovnikov's rule, to form monohaloalkanes, acid-catalysed addition of water according to Markovnikov's rule, to form alcohols.

    Carboxylic acids. Preparation by: oxidising primary alcohols and aldehydes, hydrolysing nitriles, esters, amides.  Reactions: formation of salts by reactions with metals or bases, condensation reactions with alcohols to form esters in the presence of an acid catalyst, reaction with amino groups to form amide links, reduction with lithium aluminium hydride to form primary alcohols.

    Amine classification as primary, secondary or tertiary Physical properties related to structure. Amines as weak bases and their use in salt formation.

    Aromatic hydrocarbons and reactions of benzene. Structure, bonding and stability of the benzene ring. Substitution reactions of benzene (phenyl); alkylation, nitration, sulfonation and halogenation as examples of electrophilic substitution in benzene and other aromatic compounds

     

    Experimental determination of structure

    Elemental microanalysis. Determination of the masses of C, H, O, S and N in a sample of an organic compound in order to determine its empirical formula.

     

    Spectroscopy

    Mass spectrometry. Interpretation of fragmentation data to gain structural information.

    Infra-red spectroscopy. Interpretation of spectral data to gain structural information.

    Interpretation of 1H NMR spectra. Understand how a proton NMR spectrum is produced. Interpretation of spectral data to gain structural information. Draw and analyse low resolution proton NMR spectra and to analyse high resolution proton NMR spectra.

     

    Absorption of visible light by organic molecules

    An explanation of why organic compounds are colourless or coloured with reference to molecular orbital theory or conjugated systems.

    Terpenes - The experiment 'bromination of tomato juice' is an investigation into the change of colour related to the length of the conjugated system in lycopene from tomatoes.

     Chromophores Describe a chromophore and explain its role in the colour exhibited by the compound.

     

    Pharmaceutical Chemistry

    Effect of drugs on the body. Lipinski rule of five.

    Classification of drugs. Classification of drugs as agonists or as antagonists.

    How drugs work. Identify the types of interaction between drug functional groups and receptor sites. Recognise the pharmacophore in drug molecules


    DSC 0187There are now quite a few resources for teaching chemistry uploaded onto our website.
    They are linked to, where possible, from all the appropriate outcomes at the various curricular levels. In addition, they can be browsed en masse from the pages below.

    The resources are arranged into three main groups:

    Chemistry Workshops:- These are practical investigations that come with pupils sheets, teachers/technicians guides, risk assessments and, for a lot of them, discussion acivities.

    Chemistry Demonstrations:- What they say, although a few could perhaps be adapted for a class experiment. each one has an instruction sheet and a risk assessment.

    Other Chemistry Experiments:- These are shorter practical activities, many of them aimed at P 6/7 or S 1/2 but also including ones that are suitable all the way up to Advanced Higher. Any activities which don't have enough detail to be a workshop and are not teacher demonstrations can be found here. They each have an instruction sheet and, where appropriate, a risk assessment.

    Chemistry Map of Scotland - A google map of lots of chemistry-related sites across Scotland. If you know of any I've missed out, please let me know.

    Internet Links - A short list of a few websites that provide resources to support practical chemistry.

    shakashiriIn introducing chemical demonstrations, I can do no better than to quote Richard W. Ranette in his introduction to Volume 1 of Shakashiri's 'Chemical Demonstrations: A Handbook for Teachers of Chemistry.

    The joy of chemical experimentation has been well recognized, at least from the early days of alchemy, and our appreciation of chemical charm probably dates back to the prehistoric discovery of ways to make and control fire.

    Therefore, it seems useful to coin the term exocharmic reaction (from the Greek exo-, turning out) and, particularly in our role as chemistry teachers, to seek and share techniques for liberating as much charm as possible from the chemical changes our students see in the laboratory and classroom demonstrations.

    I hope that at least some of the demonstrations below will be of a sufficiently exocharmic nature as to appeal to many chemistry teachers.

    Each one has and instruction sheet, containing a brief explanation of the chemistry involved as well as links to places whee it may sit in the curriculum as well as details of how to carry out the experiment. Each demonstration also has a model risk assessment for you to customise for your use.

    Aluminium - Iodine reaction - Solid iodine and aluminium powders are mixed and a few drops of hot water added. This initiates a reaction to form aluminium iodide, producing clouds of purple iodine vapour in the process. (CfE level 3, H)

    Ammonia fountain - A flask full of ammonia gas has a jet through a bung, the other end is submerged in water with aqn indicator. the introduction of a small amount of water lets some ammonia dissolve in it, reducing the pressure and producing a fountain as the water drawn into the dlask. (CfE level 3, N5)

    Ammonium dichromate volcano - Once initiated (by heat) ammonium dichromate decomposes producing sparks and a large 'eruption' of chromium oxide. (CfE level 3, H)

    An autocatalytic reaction - A few drops of acid initiate a reaction which proceeds down a measuring cylinder changing colour as it goes - catalysed by its own products.

    Bad Breath Indicator - A simple demonstration of buffer solutions (CfE Level 3, AH)

    Beakers Not Conicals - A 'trick' reaction, where the colour change will only take place in a beaker, not a conical flask. (CfE level 3)

    Blue Bottle Reaction - The classic redox reaction. Solution goes blue when shaken and then goes clear again on standing (CfE level 3, H)

    Blue Light - Chemiluminescence involving luminol (CfE level 3)

    Cannon Fire - Exciting demonstration of catalytic breakdown of hydrogen peroxide. (CfE level 3, H)

    Catalyst at Work - A demonstration of a temporary activated complex (CfE level 3, H, AH)

    Chip Pan Fire - A spectacular demonstration of what happens when you add water to burning oil. (CfE Level 3, N3, H)

    Coca Cola Powered Clock - simple electrochemistry activity (CfE level 2 & 3)

    Colour change chameleon -  An attractive reaction that passes through several of the different coloured oxidation states of manganese. (AH)

    Colourful catalysis - A great RSC experiment demonstrating the effectiveness of a catalyst on the reaction between sodium thiosulphate and hydrogen peroxide. (CfE level 3, N4, H (AH?))

    Colourful Flowers - Fun demonstration of pH and indicators (CfE level 3, N4, N5)

    Colourless, Orange or Blue - An oscillating chemical reaction (Briggs Rauscher) (CfE level 3, N4, N5, H)

    A Cool Experiment - An endothermic reaction freezing a beaker to the bench.(CfE level 3, N4, N5)

    Ligands of copper complexes - A series of ligands, each displacing the last in an aqueous copper solution. (AH)

    Cornflour Slime - Fun, but messy, example of a non-Newtonian fluid.(CfE level 2)

    Cut and Heal - A dramatic use of the production of blood-red iron thiocyanate. (CfE level 3)

    Dehydrated Snow - A simple hydrogel activity.(CfE level 3, N4)

    Density of Ice - What it says. A demonstration in oil to show the different densities. (CfE level 3 & 4)

    Different Drinks from the Magic Bottle -Another 'trick reaction'.(CfE level 3)

    Disappearing Water - Another simple hydrogel activity (CfE level 3)

    Dry ice in indicator solution - Dry ice is dropped into a flask of universal indicator. Clouds of dense 'smoke' come off and the indicator changes colour. (CfE level 3, N4)

    Dynamite Soap - Generation and detonation of bubbles of hydrogen/oxygen (CfE level 3, N4, N5, H)

    Electric Writing - a fun take on a redox reaction.(CfE level 3)

    Electrolysis of Water - Exactly what it says (CfE level 3)

    Electroplating Faces - Electroplating of nickel onto parts of a copper coin (CfE level 3, N4)

    Elephant's Toothpaste - exothermic, catalytic breakdown of hydrogen peroxide producing lots of foam.(CfE level 3, H)

    Equilibrium and Le Chatelier - An equilibrium between two different coloured species that changes position with temperature. (CfE level 3, H)

    Ethanol Rocket - A 2 litre fizzy drinks bottle is fired along a string/wire by the combuston of ethanol. (CfE level 3/4, N4, N5, H)

    Fire Writing - Demonstration of the effect of oxidising agents on combustible materials (paper in this case) (CfE level 3, H)

    Flame Colours - Some different methods of getting good colours for flame tests. (CfE level 3, N4, N5)

    Foam Fire Extinguisher - A messy reaction that produces lots of foam - modelling a fire extinguisher. (CfE level 3)

    Genie in a Bottle - exothermic, catalytic breakdown of hydrogen peroxide producing lots of steam this time.(CfE level 3, N4, H)

    Ghost Metal  - A variant on the classic copper-catalysed oxidation of luminol. The copper ions are provided by coins which glow in the dark. (H)

    Gloopy and Gooey- A couple of simple cross-linking polymerisation reactions.(CfE level 3, N4, N5)

    Growing Silver Trees - Displacement reactions producing dendritic silver crystals (CfE level 3, N4, H)

    Hot Stuff - Exciting exothermic reaction between [potassium VII manganate and propan-1,2,3-triol (glycerol) (CfE level 3, N4, H)

    Hot ice - A supersaturated solution of sodium ethanoate instantly solidifies into an 'ice' tower in an exothermic process. (CfE level 3, N4)

    Invisible Writing - A simple chemical invisible ink and its developer. (CfE level 3)

    Ion Migration - lead and iodide ions diffuse to give a vivid yellow deposit of lead iodide (CfE level 3)

    Law of Similar Shapes - another 'trick' reaction involving acid/base indicators (CfE level 3, N4)

    Ligands of copper complexes - a series of solutions of different ligands are added to a copper sulphate solution. Each one sequentially displaces the previous one producing a different coloured solutuion. (AH)

    Light Sticks - The effect of temperature on the intensity of chemiluminescence using the reagents from light sticks (CfE level 3, N4, N5, H)

    Methane bags - Exploding plastic bags of methans and methane/oxygen (CfE level 3, N4)

    Methane Bubbles - burning bubbles of methane (CfE level 3, N4)

    Methane Tin - demonstrating the importance of the right ratio of methane/air to create an explosion in a coffee tin (CfE level 3, N4)

    Non-Burning £5 Note - Demonstration to show latent heat as well as combustion (CfE level 3, N4)

    Northern Lights - Showing the reactivity of aluminium: with acid and displacement with copper II chloride. (CfE level 3, N4)

    Oxidation States of manganese  - Demonstrating all six oxidation states of manganese (AH)

    Oxidation States of Vanadium - Demonstrating the five oxidation states of manganese (AH)

    Piezo Rockets - mini rockets using hydrogen.(CfE level 3, N4, N5)

    Photochemical blue bottle - reversible decolourisation of methylene blue just with light. A 0th order reaction (CfE level 3, N4)

    Rainbow Reaction - a colourful demonstration of universal indicator along a pH gradient.(CfE level 3, N4, N5, AH)

    Red, White and Blue - another 'trick' reaction where the same chemical gives three different colours in different containers. (CfE level 3)

    Rhubarb! Rhubarb! Rhubarb - a good demonstration of a redox reagent. (CfE level 3, N4, N5, H)

    Screaming Jelly Baby - A classic demonstration of the oxidising power of potassium V chlorate

    Silicon and Silanes from Sand - Reduction of sand by magnesium to give silicon and putting the 'ash' in eater to generate spontaneously flammable silanes. (CfE level 3, H)

    Silver Mirror - Beautiful appearence of a silver mirror on the inside of glass flask. (CfE level 3, H, AH)

    Spell Casting - another 'trick' reaction using phenolphthalein and unobserved amounts of acids and bases. (CfE level 3, N4)

    Thermit - A spectacular displacement reaction that produces molten iron - this version can be done in the classroom. (CfE level 3, N4, H)

    Thionin - A photochemical reaction that produces a colour change. (CfE level 3)

    Traffic Lights - A good redox reaction - a variant of the blue bottle. (CfE level 3, H)

    Turning Copper Coins into Silver and Goldd - plating coins with zinc and then heating to produce gold (brass) (CfE level 3, N4)

    When a Fossil Fuel is Burned - classic demonstration of the products of burning fossil fuels (CfE level 3& 4, N4)

    Whoosh Bottle - an exciting demonstration of an exothermic reaction and the energy in fuels (CfE level 3, N4, N5, H)

    BenedictsQSmallYou will find here a variety of experiments from the very simple upwards, including a range of microscale work.

    Acid Rain in the Classroom  -  a simple safe activity to show how CO2, NO2 and SO2 can cause acid rain. (N4)

    Amazing Penny Experiment - a simple experiment looking at surface tension by seeing how many drops of water you can get on a penny. (CfE level 2, H)

    Azo-Dyes  - A simple way to prepare some azo-dyes on a test tube scale (AH)

    Black Magic - Simple paper chromatography of ink. (CfE level 2/3)

    Blueprints - A simple version of the cyanotype process to show the artistic use of a photochemical reaction in an old, iron-based photographic process. (CfE level 3, H)

    Bubble Bomb - Using sodium carbonate/hydrogen carbonate and vinegar to blow up a plastic bag. (CfE level 3)

    Bubbularium - examining the colours produced by interference patterns in bubbles (CfE level 3)

    Copper capers - Using vinegar to clean copper coins and seeing subsequent reactions with air. (CfE level 3)

    Copper complexes - Solutions of different ligands are added in turn to a copper II solution. As each one displaces the last, a series of colour changes can be observed. (AH)

    Cornflour Slime - making cornflour slime and investigating some of its properties. (CfE level 2)

    Drop electrolysis - A series of small scale electrolysis reactions carried out on the laminated instruction sheet. (CfE, N4?, N5)

    Food Science - A series of simple experiments and demonstrations that illustrate some aspects of food chemistry and other food science.

    Galvanic cells - making a supercorroding galvanic cell from magnesium ribbon and steel wool (N4, N5)

    Growing Crystals - growing 'spikes' of magnesium sulphate crystals. (CfE levels 2/3)

    Iron Drops - a series of reactions of iron compounds, carried out with drops on a laminated sheet. (CfE level 3, H, AH)

    Latex cross-linking - Some simple reactions involving the cross-linking of latex solution to form rubber balls, rubber bands and foam rubber. (CfE Level 3, N4)

    Magnesium Burning - exactly what it says. Burn magnesium ribbon and observe the change in mass. (CfE level 3, N4)

    Microelectrolysis - Microscale electrolysis of copper chloride carried out in a petri dish - incorporating displacement of non-metals. (N5, H)

    Oil from coffee grounds - A simple solvent extraction to get oil from waste coffee grounds. (CfE Level 3, N4, N5)

    pH of the Planet - A simple method for an investigation into the pH of environmental water samples (N4 and possibly AH)

    Polymer Slime - making and investigating 'slime' from PVA and borax. (CfE level 3, N4, N5)

    Red Cabbage Indicator - making and testing a pH indicator from red cabbage. (CfE level 3)

    Salt Volcano - sprinkilng salt on an oil/water mixture with food colouring in produces an effect a little like a lava lamp.  (CfE levels 2/3)

    Sunscreens and Cyanotypes - Using a version of the cyanotype photographic process, instead of uv beads, to investigate the effectiveness of sunscreens (H)

    DocumentsThe time has come for the upload of resources to the new site. There are links to each topics 'homepage' from wherever in the curriculum we think it fits, and that homepage will have links to download experimental guide, teacher's and technician's guides, risk assessment etc.

    Do be aware that just because we suggest something for a particular level, that is not prescriptive - you can use it for whichever level you like.

    The documents are in MS Word (or powerpoint) format so you can customise them for your own use)

    It would probably be useful, though to have a list of all of them in one place so you can see what there is. Here you are then.

    It will be updated from time to time as new resources become available and I will try to highlight anything new.

    Antioxidants: A Range of investigations based around the Briggs-Rauscher oscillating reaction to look at antioxidant levels in fruits and teas (though the method can be adapted for any antioxidant). (CfE level 3, N4, N5, H)

    Biodiesel: A range of experiments based around the production and testing of Biodiesel from vegetable oil. (CfE level 3, N4, N5, H)

    Bleaching Blue Food Dye: Reaction to determine rate constant and order of reaction from the bleaching of blue food colouring by domestic bleach. (At lower levels it can simply be used to look at the rate of reaction without the more complex mathematics) (CfE level 3, N5, H, AH)

    Chemical Car: A novel way to look at rates of reaction. Construction of a 'car' that who's motor is linked to a LDR allowing for the car to automatically stop (or start) as the reaction mixture colours or fades. (Using a version of the iodine clock reaction). (CfE level 3,  N4) (At the moment the car construction is rather complex - we are looking for a simpler method)

    Ceramics: A suite of activities to explore the properties of some ceramics. (Making polymer clay, natural cement, carbonation of concrete, porosity, effect of acids. More will be added as time goes on. (CfE level 4, N4)

    (son of) Flash Chromatography: Flash chromatography carried out in a syringe - using talc (or cornflour) - can be used to separate samples of food dyes or plant pigments. (CfE level 3, N4, H)

    Cobalt Complexes: Synthesis and analysis of amino-cobalt complexes (Including IR spectroscopy) (AH)

    Colorimetry on the cheap:  Build and test a colorimeter using easily available materials for a few pence in about 15 minutes. No specific curriculum link for this workshop but colorimetry can be used in many areas of the curriculum.

    Conductivity: Activity using a (home made) conductivity flask to follow neutralisation reactions. (N5)

    Copper Etching: Activity using the displacement reaction between copper sulphate solution and zinc plate to etch a design. (CfE level 3, N4)

    Copper amino complexes: Preparation of isomers of amino copper complexes (and potential analysis by IR spectroscopy). (Preparation CfE level 3 (possibly) analysis AH)

    Dye Sensitised Solar Cells: An activity to show generation of electricity from plant pigments. (CfE level 3, N4)

    Finding an Equilibrium Constant: An experiment to to determine experimentally the equilibrium constant for the reaction between methanol, and ethanoic acid to form the ester methyl ethanoate. (H, AH)

    Fizz pops: Using vitamin C tablets and bicarbonate of soda to follow a reaction rate. Reaction mixture is put into a film canister, water added and the lid put on. Time is recorded before it blows up. (CfE level 3)

    Guzzling Plants: An experiment and discussion activities looking at phytoremediation and the development of brownfield sites. (CfE level 3, N5 - and N4/5 Biology)

    Hydrogels: A series of short experiments looking at the properties of hydrogels. (N5, H)

    Ice NiceSome experiments into the chemistry of de-icing roads and runways. (N4)

    Lemons Investigating the effect of concentration and temperature on rate of reaction using lemon juice and permanganate. (CfE level 3)

    Lip Balm: Activities researching and then making lip balms. (CfE level 3, N4)

    Liquid Crystals: Making liquid crystals of different compositions and investigating the effect of temperature on theri colour changes. (CfE level 4, N4)

    Ocean Acidification: An investigation into the causes and effects on the oceans of CO2 in the atmosphere. (AH)

    Oranges are the only fruit: A look at the chemical resources that can be extracted from oranges (including limonene) and how this is an exemplar of the Circular Economy (CfE levels 3&4, N4, H, AH)

    Plastic Fantastic: Synthesis and testing of an electrically conductive plastic - polypyrrole. (CfE level 3, N4, N5)

    Polymer Slime: Making slime from borax and PVA glue - and looking at the properties and the composition varies. (CfE level 3, N4 & H?)

    Rhubarb Rhubarb: (Similar to Lemons) Using rhubarb decolourising permanganate to follow the rate of reaction, looking at concentration and surface area. (CfE level 3, N5, H)

    Rocks and Minerals: A series of simple experiments to make samples of sedimentary, igneous and metamorphic 'rocks'. (CfE level 3)

    Rocks to Riches: Extraction of copper from 'ore' by leaching and electrowinning and analysis of copper content. (N4, N5, H)

    Salt and Battery: Use of fruit juices and different metal electrodes to generate an electric current. (CfE level 3, N4, N5)

    Shampoo: Activity to make shampoo, involving steam distillation to extract natural essences. (CfE level 3, N4, N5, H?)

    Smart Materials: Some short activities looking at the properties of commercially available smart/novel chemical materials. (CfE level 3, N3, N5)

    Spectroscope (DVD): Construction of a DVD spectroscope. (AH)

    Tea, Iron and Manganese content: Analysis of iron and manganese levels in different teas. (N5, AH)

    Vinegar Cheats: Using a simple titration (with pipettes) to find out which samples of vinager have been watered down. CfE level 3, N4)

    Vitamin C Drops: Determining the concentration of Vitamin C in a a variety of fruit juices using a simple titration with iodine. (CfE level 3, N4, H)

    Vitamin C in Vegetables: Activity to determine the concentration of Vitamin C in fruit and vegetables by titration against DCPIP. (N4, N5, H)

    Water Testing: A series of differing procedures to test for mineral content in water. boron, calcium, carbonates, iron, magnesium, nitrates, nitrites and phosphates. (N4, N4, H)

    Maillard-2This page is the landing page for a series of food chemistry experiments which were devised to support some videos produced by Abertay University, the Scottish Food and Drink Federation, Education Scotland and SSERC.

    The experiments can all be carried out easily in the classroom and help to illustrate the importance of chemistry and chemists to the food industry - a hugely important part of the Scottish economy.

    The Experiments (which can be accessed along with the videos by clicking on the links below) are:

    Emulsions - A look at emulsion formation and the effect of different emulsifying agents.

    Enzymic browning - A look at the conditions that affect the rate of browning of apples (as an exampke of fruit and vegetables in general)

    Maillard Reactions - some simple examples of this hugely importanc class of reactions between sugars and amino acids that produce colour and aromas in many cooked foods.

    Oxidative Rancidity - Simple experiments to investigate the effect of different conditions on the oxidation of fats.

    TLC of amino acids in Soy Sauce - an investigation into the different amino acids that can be found in different types/brands of soy sauce.

    As well as videos to support each of the activities, there is another one that showcases the different employment opportunities, particularly for scientists, in the food industry. 

     

     

    If ypur interenet does not allow easy watching of this online, you can download it here. Right-click on the link and select 'save link as . . .' or 'save target as . . .'

    Microscale-2Microscale chemistry is, paradoxically, growing all the time. (For more information, see the article, Microscale Chemistry - What and Why?)

    This is the departure page for you to find a range of microscale chemistry activities. You will also find pages on how to make or purchase much. of the equipment used for microscale chemistry.

    Big thanks should be given here to Bob Worley from CLEAPSS who has been preaching the Gospel of Microscale for many a year and who developed most of the activities listed here. (Though they have been adapted at SSERC to fit more easily into the Scottish Curriculum). His website can be found here (http://microchemuk.weebly.com/) and is well worth keeping an eye on.

    Here is a list, with hyperlinks, of the various microscale activities that can be found in this section along with a brief summary of each.

    Ammonia - A series of drop-scale reactions carried out in a petri-dish, which, along with the small scale, makes it suitable to carry out in the open laboratory. (CfE level 3, N5)

    Conductivity - Using a DIY conductivity meter to investigates conductivity of solutions. (CfE level 3, N5, H)

    Cracking - The small-scale cracking of paraffin oil to produce a mixture of smaller alkanes. (N4)

    Diffusing precipitates - Some simple, drop-scale experiments looking at the formation of precipitates as ions diffuse. (CfE level 3)

    Drop electrolysis - A series of micro-scale investigations into the electrolysis of different solutions. (CfE level 3, N5)

    Electrode potentials - A small-scale, convenient method of investigation electrode potentials of metal pairs using overlapping strips of filter paper. (CfE level 3, N3, N4)

    Electrolysis of lead bromide - A microscale version of the classic experiment to show that a molten ionic solid will conduct electricity. The small scale means it can be done in the open lab. (CfE level 3, N4, N5)

    Formula of magnesium oxide - Using a bottle-top crucible to carry out the oxidation of magnesium ribbon and re-weighing to determine the formula. (CfE level 3, N4)

    Hoffman voltameter - Using a microscale Hoffman voltameter, made using syringes, to investigate the electrolysis of water. (CfE level 3, N3)

    Indicators - Two experiments investigating indicators on the microscale. (CfE level 3, N3, N5, AH)

    Iron Drops - A series of microscale reactions to show the chemistry of iron compounds carried out on a drop scale. (CfE level 3, AH)

    Iron-sulphur - A small-scale reaction of iron and sulphur followed by investigation of the sulphide. The small scale approach means it does not need to be carried out in a fume cupboard. (CfE level 3, N4)

    Marble chip - Using a bespoke nichrome wire holder to decompose the calcium carbonate in a marble chip and investigate the products formed. (CfE level 3, N4)

    Microelectrolysis - Using carbon-fibre electrodes to electrolyse a solution of copper chloride and to further investigate the displacement reactions of the halogens. (CfE level 3, N3, H)

    Polymerisation - A microscale polymerisation reaction, of methyl 2-methylpropenoate (methyl methacrylate) to make perspex. (N4, N5)

    Reduction of copper oxide with carbon - Using a bottle-top crucible to reduce copper II oxide to copper using carbon. CfE level 3, N3, N4, N5, Higher)

    Thermit - A microscale version of this classic demonstration that can easily be done in the open lab. ((CfE level 3, N4, H)

    Thiosulphate / acid reaction - microscale - A small-scale variation of the popular reaction for determining rates that reduces the production of toxic sulphur dioxide. (CfE level 3, N3, N4, N5, H)

    Titration - A microscale version of a titration using a pasteur pipettes as a burette. The reaction can be followed either by counting the drops or by monitoring the change of mass on a balance. (CfE level 3, N5, H, AH)

    Water in a hydrated salt - Using a bottle-top crucible and a spirit burner to determine the amount of water in hydrated salts. (CfE level 3, N4)

    Zinc electroplating - A microscale version of the classic zinc electroplating experiment. (CfE level 3, N4)

     

    One of the great advantages of the microscale approach, particularly in these cash-strapped times is the fact that it can be significantly less expensive than working at a normal scale.

    Part of this is due to the fact that far less is used of any reagents, some of which can be expensive. But another saving is that many, even most, of the experiments can be carried out using cheap, sometimes home-made equipment rather than needing expensive (and fragile) laboratory glassware.

    The pages linked to here, give information on the use and/or making of all sorts of pieces of equipment that will make your microscale chemistry more affordable.

    Balances - An overview of inexpensive balances that are suitable for microscale chemistry use.

    Conductivity tester - How to make and use a portable conductivity tester.

    Heating - Methods of heating on a microscale. Including How to make a mini spirit burner and How to make a micro heating mantle

    Reaction vessels - a look at suitable vessels for carrying out reactions in or on. Laminated sheets, Spotting tiles, vials/bottles, combiplates and crucibles

    Supports - Devices for holding your reaction vessels in place. Including clamps, a mini tripod attachment for the spirit burner and a bespoke marble chip holder.

    Titration - Methods for carrying out titration on a microscale using inexpensive equipment.

    Microscale Hoffman Voltameter - How to maks a cheap voltameter for a few pounds.

     

    CfEChemistryAs a practical subject, chemistry has numerous skills that need to be mastered. 

    They need to be mastered not just to enable the carrying out og high quality practical work but they are also actually assessed as a part of many of the qualifications.

    We decided, therefore, that some extra information about safe and effective ways to exercise these skills would be in order. The skills are listed in the table below from where you can link to a separate page for each of them.

    Anodising
    Arculus method
    chromatography
    colorimetry
    distillation
    drying solutions
    electroplating
    etching
    filtration
    flame tests
    heating substances
    Indicators, choosing and using
    making crystals
    melting point determination
    Quickfit apparatus
    refluxing
    solvent extraction
    standard solutions
    Titration
    Using a burette
    Using a pipette
    Using a volumetric flask
    Weighing

    CfEChemistryThis page is a hub for the Chemistry resources for levels 3 and 4 of the Curriculum for Excellence.

    As such it concentrates on those outcomes which relate in some way to Chemistry. For resources for other subject areas, you will need to look elsewhere on this site. (all the resources here can also be found via the main CfE pages as well)

    Energy Sources and Sustainability  SCN 04

    Learners explore types, sources and uses of energy and develop their understanding of how energy is transferred and conserved. They consider the relevance of these concepts to everyday life. They explore the nature and sustainability of energy sources and discuss benefits and assess possible risks to form an informed view of responsible energy use.

    Processes of the Planet SCN 05

    Learners explore the changing states of matter and the physical and chemical processes which influence Earth's atmosphere and oceans. They learn about climate change as a natural process in time as well as the result of human activity. Through connections with collaborative studies of landscape, weather and climate in social studies they build up an integrated picture of the dynamic nature of Earth.

    Properties and Uses of Substances SCN 15 & 16

    By exploring the properties of different substances and how they can be changed, learners gradually develop their understanding of the connection between structure and properties. They explore the development of new substances which have useful properties, and begin to relate physical and chemical properties to models of atomic structure. Learners begin to use symbols and chemical formulae as a way of communicating information about elements and compounds.

    Earth's Materials  SCN 17

    Learners develop their knowledge and understanding of substances that make up the Earth's surface. Properties, uses and methods of extraction of such materials are explored. Opportunities exist to discuss the importance of carbon compounds derived from crude oil to our lives.

    Chemical Changes  SCN 18 & 19

    Learners gradually develop an understanding of chemical changes. They consider processes which take place in the environment and in the laboratory, and develop their understanding of the environmental impact of some changes. They develop their understanding of energy changes in chemical reactions and some of the factors affecting the rates of reactions. Learners develop the use of chemical names, formulae and equations as a way of conveying information about chemical changes.

    Topical Science SCN 20

    By considering current issues of science, learners increasingly develop their understanding of scientific concepts and their capacity to form informed social, moral and ethical views. They reflect upon and critically evaluate media portrayal of scientific findings.

     

     

    DSC 0187There are now quite a few resources for teaching chemistry uploaded onto our website.They are linked to, where possible, from all the appropriate outcomes at the various curricular levels. In addition, they can be browsed en masse from the pages below.

    The resources are arranged into three main groups:

    Chemistry Workshops :- These are practical investigations that come with pupils sheets, teachers/technicians guides, risk assessments and, for a lot of them, discussion acivities.

    Chemical Demonstrations :- What they say, although a few could perhaps be adapted for a class experiment. each one has an instruction sheet and a risk assessment.

    Other Chemistry Experiments :- These are shorter practical activities, many of them aimed at P 6/7 or S 1/2 but also including ones that are suitable all the way up to Advanced Higher. Any activities which don't have enough detail to be a workshop and are not teacher demonstrations can be found here. They each have an instruction sheet and, where appropriate, a risk assessment.

    Chemistry Map of Scotland :- A google map of lots of chemistry-related sites across Scotland. If you know of any I've missed out, please let me know.

    Internet Links - A short list of a few websites that provide resources to support practical chemistry.

    IMG 4203

    Welcome to the homepage of SSERC's Biology Team!

     

    We offer a range of services to members of SSERC including:

     

    More detailed information on the above areas can be accessed by clicking on the links.

     

    Please This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.for more information.

     

    Micro 1aWe provide here a laboratory resource suitable for teachers, lecturers, technicians and senior students. The resource comprises instruction sheets for many of the basic microbiological techniques used throughout the various Biology courses within the Scottish Curriculum.

     

    Teachers and technicians will find this a useful resource for preparation and disposal of microbiological materials for CfE Levels 3 and 4, National 4, National 5, Higher and Advanced Higher Biology.

     

    Instructions are provided for single techniques and may be used 'stand-alone'. Many of the techniques described are based on training materials developed initially to support the 'Strathclyde Code of Practice' as adopted by the majority of Scottish Education Authorities.  That Code of Practice (now in its 3rd Edition [revised 2012]) is essentially a set of preventive and protective measures derived from outcomes of model risk assessments.  The information provided here may in turn be regarded as a set of preventive and protective measures resulting from a process of risk assessment.


    Microbiological Techniques Films

    Here you will find a set of short films each demonstrating a particular technique. The films should be used in conjunction with the microbiological techniques instruction sheets.

     file0009197830Welcome to the Biology Resources section of the SSERC website! 

     

    From this page you will be able to navigate your way to the various resources which we have, over the years, developed to support learning and teaching in schools and colleges.  This part of the SSERC website is undergoing a radical overhaul at the present time and so please bear with us as we try and rationalise our offerings!

     

    Our resources are organised against the various areas of the curriculum and each can be accessed from the menu on the left hand side of this page.  If you cannot find what you are looking for then do feel free to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

     Sleeping Dormouse

    Within SSERC we have a range of activities which may be useful to support learning and teaching and these are listed in the following sections. Please note that some activities may be useful in more than one Unit and indeed may be useful in other Courses (e.g. National 5 Biology) and our categorisation of activities reflects this flexibility.

     

    The National 4 Biology Course has four mandatory Units:

     

     

     

     

     

    Frog in pond

    Within SSERC we have a range of activities which may be useful to support learning and teaching and these are listed in the following sections. Please note that some activities may be useful in more than one Unit and indeed may be useful in other Courses (e.g. National 4 and/or Higher Biology) and our categorisation of activities reflects this flexibility.

     

     

    The National 5 Biology Course has three mandatory Units: 

     

    National 5 Assignment

    The SQA has recently announced changes to the Course Specification for National 5 Biology. You can access the Revised Course Specification here.

    One of the major changes which will come into effect at the start of the 2017/2018 academic session is that practical / experimental / fieldwork will become a mandatory feature of the assignment. The Biology Team has been commissioned by SQA to produce 2 Resource Packs which could be used to support teachers and students with this change. The resource packs can be accessed from the link below.

     

     

    file5671243781203Resources are categorised in terms of Key Areas which are defined in the National 5 Biology Course Support Notes published by SQA

    • Cell structure.
    • Transport across cell membranes.
    • Producing new cells.
    • DNA and the production of proteins.
    • Proteins and enzymes.
    • Genetic engineering.
    • Photosynthesis.
    • Respiration.

    6985213264 576cb31b46 nResources are categorised in terms of Key Areas which are defined in the National 5 Biology Course Support Notes published by SQA

    • Cells, tissues and organs.
    • Stem cells and meristems.
    • Control and communication.
    • Reproduction.
    • Variation and inheritance.
    • The need for transport.
    • Effects of lifestyle choices on human transport and exchange systems.

    Earth moonResources are categorised in terms of Key Areas which are defined in the National 5 Biology Course Support Notes published by SQA:

     

    • Biodiversity and the distribution of life.
    • Energy in ecosystems.
    • Sampling techniques and measurement of abiotic and biotic factors.
    • Adaptation, natural selection and the evolution of species
    • Human impact on the environment
     Male Orange-tip
    Within SSERC we have a range of activities which may be useful to support learning and teaching and these are listed in the following sections. Please note that some activities may be useful in more than one Unit and indeed may be useful in other Courses (e.g. Higher Human Biology, Advanced Higher Biology) and our categorisation of activities reflects this flexibility.
     

    The Higher Biology Course has three mandatory Units: 

     

    SQA Assignment

    SSERC has been involved in the preparation of resource packs to support the Higher Biology Assignment.  The first of these resources is available from the link below:

     

    Data Sets

    We have gathered together a number of data sets using standard protocols.  Access the data sets and associated files here.

    Genome homeThrough the study of DNA and the genome, this Unit explores the molecular basis of evolution and biodiversity. The universal nature of DNA as the information storage molecule is emphasised, while relevant differences in the organisation of DNA between prokaryotes and eukaryotes are highlighted. The link between the precision of replication of DNA and the complementary nature of DNA bases is central to the understanding of both DNA replication for cell division and the in vitro replication technology of PCR.

    sbs-metabolismMetabolism is the network of connected and integrated pathways with its reversible and irreversible steps and alternative routes. The control of metabolic pathways is essential to cell survival.

     

    The Metabolism and Survival unit is divided into 8 main areas of content viz: Metabolic pathways and their control, Cell respiration, Metabolic rate, Metabolism in conformers and regulators, Metabolism and adverse conditions, Environmental control of metabolism, Genetic control of metabolism and Ethical considerations in the use of microorganisms - hazards and the control of risk. In the sections that follow you will find a series of links to resources and activities - some of these have been produced by SSERC whilst others are from sources which we are happy to endorse/recommend. 

     

    pia08329-earth-browseOur human population is dependent upon sufficient and sustainable food production from the harvest of a narrow range of crop and livestock species. The importance of both plant productivity and the manipulation of genetic diversity in maintaining food security is emphasised. Many individual organisms are also interdependent, whether as symbiotic partners or as members of a social group. Biodiversity studies attempt to catalogue and understand the human impact on patterns of diversity and extinction in our biosphere.

     

    The Sustainability and Interdependence Unit is divided into 8 main areas of content viz: Food supply, plant growth and productivity, Plant and Animal breeding, Crop protection, Animal welfare, Symbiosis, Social behaviour, Mass extinction and biodiversity, and Threats to biodiversity. In the sections that follow you will find a series of links to resources and activities - some of these have been produced by SSERC whilst others are from sources which we are happy to endorse/recommend.

     

    red and white blood cells

    Within SSERC we have a range of activities which may be useful to support learning and teaching and these are listed in the following sections. Please note that some activities may be useful in more than one Unit and indeed may be useful in other Courses (e.g. Higher Biology, Advanced Higher Biology) and our categorisation of activities reflects this flexibility.

     

    The Higher Human Biology Course has four mandatory Units:

    • Human Cells
    • Physiology and Health
    • Neurobiology and Communication
    • Immunology and Public Health

     

    The Units can be accessed from the links in the left-hand menu.

     

    Genetic Conditions

    Genetic diseases feature in several areas of the Higher Human Biology curriculum. SSERC has produced a resource which examines 10 of these genetic conditions.  The resource is available here.

     

    Statistics for School Biology Experiments and Advanced Higher Projects

    We are delighted to announce that SSERC has recently published ‘Statistics for School StatsBiology Experiments and Advanced Higher Projects’. This guide has been written by Graeme Ruxton (Professor of Biology at the University of St Andrews) and Jim Stafford (Senior Associate with SSERC). Graeme has a particular interest in making the principles of experimental design and the use of statistics in analysing experimental results accessible to the widest range of learners including school students and his book Experimental Design for the Life Sciences influenced the development of the Investigative Biology Unit of Advanced Higher Biology. Jim has been a Principal Teacher of Biology, a Local Authority Science Adviser and Quality Improvement Officer.  During his career Jim has worked with various partner organisations on a number of areas of science education, including leadership training, health and safety guidance, and the development of national qualifications in biology.

    Copies of the guide can be downloaded here.  Additional printed copies, at a cost of £3 each to include postage and packing, are available.  To order, please supply a purchase order number and we will arrange for copies to be sent to you on receipt.  Orders can be submitted to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

     

    SQA Assignment

    SSERC has been involved in the preparation of resource packs to support the Higher Human Biology Assignment.  We have, to date, produced two such resources and these are available from the links below.  Please note that these are draft resource packs at this stage.  Final versions will be made available in the near future.

     

    The following will be useful to those with an interest in the Ebola outbreak:

    Special Collection (Science, Thursday 18 September 2014).  Given the current outbreak, unprecedented in terms of number of people killed and rapid geographical spread, Science and Science Translational Medicine have made this collection of research and news articles on Ebola viral disease freely available to researchers and the general public. Access the collection here.

     


    The Zika virus

     

    We have gathered together some background notes on the Zika virus together with links to other information sources.  Access our notes here.

     

     

     

     

    human cellsEmphasis is placed on the maintenance of the diploid number of chromosomes in the division of somatic cells and reduction division to the haploid number of chromosomes in gametes from germline cells. Consideration is given to the research and therapeutic value of stem cells and to uncontrolled division of cancer cells providing opportunity to look at wider social issues and the relevance of applied biological science. This Unit recognises the central importance of DNA to cell processes. The emphasis is on the expression of the genotype encoded by DNA into the phenotype of protein structure and function through the mechanisms of transcription and translation. The control and regulation of metabolic pathways is essential to cell function. Metabolism should be seen as a network of connected and integrated pathways with reversible and irreversible steps and alternative routes. The role of genes in coding for enzymes that control and regulate pathways further demonstrates the central importance of DNA and the regulation of gene expression in the cell.

     

    The Human Cells unit is divided into 8 main areas of content viz: Division and differentiation in human cells, Structure and replication of DNA, Gene expression, Genes and proteins in health and disease, Human genomics, Metabolic pathways, Cellular respiration, and Energy systems in muscle cells. In the sections that follow you will find a series of links to resources and activities - some of these have been produced by SSERC whilst others are from sources which we are happy to endorse/recommend.

    healthThis Unit focuses on reproduction and the cardiovascular system, two areas where biological research and knowledge is of particular significance and relevance to the human species.

     

    The study of reproduction provides a good and clear opportunity to develop understanding of the mechanisms of hormonal control including releaser hormones, stimulation and inhibition, feedback control, multiple effects of hormones, cyclical and non-cyclical activity. By exploring physiology in health-related contexts opportunities arise naturally to discuss in an informed way social, moral and ethical issues that relate to being a responsible citizen and an informed contributor to society.

     

    Study of the cardiovascular system allows learners the opportunity to examine epithelial, connective and muscle tissue. The pathology of cardiovascular disease helps to deepen understanding of the cardiovascular system as well as to develop biological concepts such as reaction cascades and the activation of enzymes when required in applied contexts that are of particular significance to health in Scotland. Homeostatic mechanisms can be explored through study of regulation of blood cholesterol and blood glucose, factors in the onset of atherosclerosis, diabetes and obesity.

     

    The Physiology and Health unit is divided into 8 main areas of content viz:The structure and function of reproductive organs and gametes and their role in fertilisation, Hormonal control of reproduction, The biology of controlling fertility, Ante- and postnatal screening, The strucutre and function of arteries, capillaries and veins, The structure and function of the heart, Pathology of cardio vascular disease, blood glucose levels and obesity.  In the sections that follow you will find a series of links to resources and activities - some of these have been produced by SSERC whilst others are from sources which we are happy to endorse/recommend.

     

    neuronsThe study of the nervous system in humans also allows learners to gain an insight into the biological basis of psychology, further widening their scientific experience. The approach taken to the nervous system is based more on its function than structure.

     

    The degree of communication of which humans are capable has led to complex and sophisticated social behaviours. Studying learning, the change in behaviour as a result of experience, lends itself to experiential practical work.

     

     

    The Neurobiology and Communication unit is divided into 4 main areas of content viz: Divisions of the nervous system and parts of the brain, Perception and memory, The cells of the nervous system and neurotransmitters at synapses, and Communication and social behaviour. In the sections that follow you will find a series of links to resources and activities - some of these have been produced by SSERC whilst others are from sources which we are happy to endorse/recommend.

    Image1The Immunology and Public Health unit is divided into 4 main areas of content viz: Non-specific defences, Specific cellular defences, The transmission and control of infectious diseases, and Active immunisation and vaccination and the evasion of specific immune response by pathogens.  In the sections that follow you will find a series of links to resources and activities - some of these have been produced by SSERC whilst others are from sources which we are happy to endorse/recommend.

     Figure 1

    Within SSERC we have a range of activities which may be useful to support learning and teaching and these are listed in the following sections. Please note that some activities may be useful in more than one Unit and indeed may be useful in other Courses (e.g. Higher Biology, Higher Human Biology) and our categorisation of activities reflects this flexibility.

     

    The Advanced Higher Biology Course has three mandatory Units:

     

    Statistics for School Biology Experiments and Advanced Higher Projects

    We are delighted to announce that SSERC has recently published ‘Statistics for School StatsBiology Experiments and Advanced Higher Projects’. This guide has been written by Graeme Ruxton (Professor of Biology at the University of St Andrews) and Jim Stafford (Senior Associate with SSERC). Graeme has a particular interest in making the principles of experimental design and the use of statistics in analysing experimental results accessible to the widest range of learners including school students and his book Experimental Design for the Life Sciences influenced the development of the Investigative Biology Unit of Advanced Higher Biology. Jim has been a Principal Teacher of Biology, a Local Authority Science Adviser and Quality Improvement Officer.  During his career Jim has worked with various partner organisations on a number of areas of science education, including leadership training, health and safety guidance, and the development of national qualifications in biology.

    Copies of the guide can be downloaded here.  Additional printed copies, at a cost of £3 each to include postage and packing, are available.  To order, please supply a purchase order number and we will arrange for copies to be sent to you on receipt.  Orders can be submitted to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

     

     Advanced Higher Biology Project Investigations

     We are pleased to announce that SSERC has recently published ‘Advanced Higher Biology Project investigations’. This guide has been written by Jim Stafford who is a Senior Associate with SSERC. Previously Jim has been a Principal Teacher of Biology, a Local Authority Science Adviser and Quality Improvement Officer.  In his foreword to the guide, Professor Iain Hunter (Executive Dean of Science at the University of Strathclyde), writes:

    This Guide, from SSERC, fills a much-needed gap for both student and teacher. It provides generic guidance and support for both. It will be invaluable in detuning the anxiety of the Investigation, and enhancing the student experience and attainment’.

    Copies of the guide can be downloaded here.  Additional printed copies, at a cost of £5 each to include postage and packing, are available.  To order, please supply a purchase order number and we will arrange for copies to be sent to you on receipt.  Orders can be submitted to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

     

     

    Data Sets

     

    We have gathered together a number of data sets using standard protocols.  Access the data sets and associated files here.

     

     

     

    CyclinD1-3This Unit focuses on the key role that proteins play in the structure and functioning of cells and organisms. In considering the proteome it builds on the understanding of the genome developed in the revised Higher Biology and Higher Human Biology Courses. The ability of proteins to fold into specific conformations and bind tightly to particular regions of other molecules provides the molecular diversity and activity necessary for the workings of a cell. This flexibility allows proteins to fill roles as enzymes, signals, receptors, channels, transporters and structural components. Signal transduction in particular allows the communication between cells necessary within multicellular organisms, and it is the emergent properties of protein-based signalling pathways that lead to the physiology of whole organisms.

     

    The study of protein is primarily a laboratory-based activity, and consequently the Unit begins with a selection of important laboratory techniques for biologists. This skills-based sequence of concepts leads from health and safety considerations, through the use of liquids and solutions, to a selection of relevant separation and antibody techniques. In addition, much work on cell biology is based on the use of cell lines, so techniques related to cell culture and microscopy are included. The teaching of these techniques could be delivered in an integrated manner within this Unit.

     

    The Cells and Proteins unit is divided into 2 main areas of content viz: Laboratory techniques for biologists, and Proteins. In the sections that follow you will find a series of links to resources and activities - some of these have been produced by SSERC whilst others are from sources which we are happy to endorse/recommend.

    This Unit explores the importance of parasites in evolution.  The majority of living species on the planet are parasitic, and, naturally, the species that are not parasites are almost certainly parasitised by them. The evolutionary 'arms race' between parasites and their hosts requires the constant reshuffling of biological variation that can only be achieved through meiosis. On a macroevolutionary scale, parasites are often considered to be responsible for the maintenance of sexual reproduction. On a microevolutionary scale, mate choice behaviour is often correlated with parasite avoidance.

     

    Biological variation is a central concept in this Unit. Variation is best observed in the natural environment, so this Unit begins with an outline of suitable techniques for ecological field study. Methods of sampling and the classification and identification of organisms are considered. In classification there is a focus on those groups that are commonly parasitic. Mark and recapture is included as one method of estimating population size. For animal behaviour studies, ethograms, time sampling and the avoidance of anthropomorphism are emphasised. The teaching of these techniques could be delivered in an integrated manner within the Unit.

     

    The Organisms and Evolution unit is divided into 2 main areas of content viz: Field techniques for biologists, and Organisms. In the sections that follow you will find a series of links to resources and activities - some of these have been produced by SSERC whilst others are from sources which we are happy to endorse/recommend.

    sherlock-holmes1This Unit will give learners a solid grounding in both the principles and practice of investigative biology. Essential ethics for biologists, as well as an introduction to the purposes and forms of different types of scientific communication, are also covered. 

     

    Learners are also introduced to the skills involved in analysis and evaluation of scientific reports. The use of data analysis techniques to explore and confirm the significance of findings is described. The planning and carrying out of a 20 hour Biology Investigation is also part of this Unit. This Biology Investigation is designed to provide opportunities to further develop investigative skills through the completion of an investigation. It also provides the opportunity for self-motivation and organisation in the development of a plan for an investigation and the collection and analysis of information obtained.

     

    The Investigative Biology unit is divided into 3 main areas of content viz: Scientific principles and process, Experimentation, and Critcal evaluation of biological research.  In the sections that follow you will find a series of links to resources and activities - some of these have been produced by SSERC whilst others are from sources which we are happy to endorse/recommend.

    Book courses online  *New form required

    Coming up -


    This section contains information relating to risk assessment in Technology.

    From the menu on the left, you can access

    - Prepared risk assessments for many processes that take place in technology departments that you can adapt for your own uses.

    - Information of the appropriate warning signs that should be displayed in different areas of the workshop.

    SkyeWelcome to the Environmental Science pages.

    Environmental science is a multidisciplinary subject focussing on the study of the environment, and the solution of environmental problems. It integrates physical, biological and information sciences (incorporating elements from ecology, physics, chemistry, zoology, mineralogy, oceanology, soil science, geology, atmospheric science, geography and others).

    The Curriculum for Excellence has qualifications in Environmental Science at national 3, 4 & 5 and at higher.

    Until now, this is a subject that has largely been overlooked by SSERC but we think the time has come to try to support this subject just like we do the more traditional sciences. Activities we already have that we think ft into the Environmental Science curriculum have been linked and we hope to add further resources over the coming months.

    Environmental Science - N3

    Environmental Science - N4

    Environmental Science - N5

    Environmental Science - Higher

     

    Sandwood BayWelcome to the National 4 Environmental Science page.

    We have made a start uploading resources for experimental work that could help to support teaching of the course.

    The resources are accessed from the unit pages which you can get to from the links below.

    Alternatively you can use the search facility.

    Living Environment

    Earth's Resources

    Sustainability

    SkyeWelcome to the National 5 Environmental Science page.

    We have made a start uploading resources for experimental work that could help to support teaching of the course.

    The resources are accessed from the unit pages which you can get to from the links below.

    Alternatively you can use the search facility.

    Living Environment

    Earth's Resources

    Sustainability

    Welcome to the HigherUllswater Environmental Science page.

    We have made a start uploading resources for experimental work that could help to support teaching of the course.

    The resources are accessed from the unit pages which you can get to from the links below.

    Alternatively you can use the search facility.

    Living Environment

    Earth's Resources

    Sustainability

    Sandwood BayWelcome to the National 3 Environmental Science page.

    We have made a start uploading resources for experimental work that could help to support teaching of the course.

    The resources are accessed from the unit pages which you can get to from the links below.

    Alternatively you can use the search facility.

    Living Environment

    Earth's Resources

    Sustainability

    Welcome to the SSERC leadership home page where we hope you will find a range of useful and interesting resources to help you develop your leadership skills.

    We believe that leaders are most effective when they develop a group identity where group members share an understanding of what is required and are motivated to achieve it. We believe that the leadership behaviours that bring about that group identity can be learned and they can be practised. Nor do you need to be a leader to practise these behaviours. Good followers make good leaders because they employ the same skills and share the same vision as the leader as they work towards a common purpose.

    Leaders need to think often, deeply and radically about what they do. Leaders should draw on sources of imaginative ideas rather than prefabricated policies. Improvement should be a habit not a goal of an effective science team.

    We hope that the resources in these pages help you in developing yourself and the culture of the teams you work with whether as a leader or a follower. Good luck!

    Publications – Here you will find details of two SSERC publications. The Excellent Science Department, which is a guide to the leadership and self-evaluation of a science department. The Modern Science Teacher is aimed a new and recently qualified teachers although it is also a useful reminder and aide memoire for the more experienced hand. Both form part of the pre-course reading for SSERC leadership courses and are available free on application to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. for teachers whose local authorities, schools or colleges are members of SSERC.

    Topics in leadership – Here you can access SSERC publications that go into aspects of science curriculum leadership in some depth. They include Evidence Based Education, Quality Assuring a Science Curriculum, Leading Professional Learning and Developing a Leadership Culture.

    Professional learning – Here you will find details of the two SSERC leadership courses Leading for Excellence in Science which is offered annually and Science for Curriculum Leaders and Heads of Faculty which is offered every two years. Both are two part residential courses.

    Quizzes – Here you will find quizzes that although light-hearted have serious intent. We hope these will give you an insight into delegation, teamwork and attitudes to change.

    Book Reviews – Here you will find reviews of a recommended selection of books on key issues relevant to the work of a Science Curriculum Leader. These are the books to read if you want to be at the top of your game as a curriculum leader in science.

    Welcome to the main health & safety part of the SSERC website. To gain access to all the resources please log on with your username & password.

    If you've forgotten your username and/or password please follow the links at the bottom of the log-on area.

    Camera Gals

     

    Professional Development @ SSERC

    Please note: We are having some problems with our on-line booking system which we are trying to resolve.  If you are interested in applying for a place on one of our courses please call (01383 626070) or email us on This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and we will record your name and details and get back to you with further information as soon as we can.  If sending us an email please make sure you include the name of your organisation and the course which you are interested in booking.

     

    Welcome to the professional development part of the SSERC website. This is where you will be able to locate information about our range of courses.

      

    We are proud of the national programme of professional development which we offer in support of science and technology education. In the period from April 2009 to March 2012 over 90% of Scottish schools and colleges were represented at one or more of our professional development courses. Such work could not be achieved without the support of a range of partners most notably the Scottish Government and the National STEM Learning Centre (NSLC). (An external review of our provision has been published).

     

    Our professional development courses range from twilight events, day-courses through to residential meetings lasting up to 5 days in total (these latter courses are generally delivered over 2 parts). A number of our courses are delivered through e-learning systems and use Glow-meet technology. Our curriculum coverage spans both primary and secondary sectors and we offer events for teachers, trainee teachers and technicians.   Our portfolio is varied and includes:

     

    • Courses for Probationers and newly qualified teachers
    • Subject specific courses for teachers in primary and secondary sectors
    • A range of transition courses to promote enhanced interaction between primary and secondary practitioners
    • Health and Safety courses for teachers and technicians
    • Design and manufacturing courses for technology teachers
    • Courses targeted at science and technology support staff (many of these courses are levelled and credit-rated by SQA within the Scottish Credit and Qualifications Framework
    • Leadership courses for Curriculum Leaders and Heads of Faculty
    • The annual SSERC Science and Technology Conference

     

     Please contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. to see which courses qualify for such ENTHUSE funding.

     

     

    Please This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. us for more information or to discuss bespoke courses which can be offered.

     

    Physics CPD

    Welcome to the area of the SSERC website on which you will find details of our professional development support for physics.

     

    In SSERC we are proud of the quality and the variety of courses which we offer to teachers of physics and we recognise the need for professional development opportunities which focus on offering support at a time of significant curriculum change.

     

    Within SSERC we have developed a range of courses which focus on practical, hands-on activities that are easily applied in the classroom. Our course offerings range from early secondary to Advanced Higher and we offer both residential and non-residential opportunities.

     

    This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Please contact us (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.) for more information on any of our courses or to discuss bespoke courses which can be offered.

     

    Skills for Work: Laboratory Science National 5

    A new course, Skills for Work: Laboratory Science National 5, has recently been introduced into schools and colleges in Scotland. This 2-part course will run 22-23 September with part 2 on 9th February 2018.

    Our consultations with colleagues in schools and colleges indicate that Laboratory Science National 5 is often taught by an individual teacher who may lack detailed subject knowledge in aspects outside their own area(s) of expertise. We plan to support the Laboratory Science National 5 course by offering participants the opportunity to explore laboratory procedures and practices which can be used in delivery across the course.

    If you are teaching or working as a technician in a Local Authority funded-school in Scotland you will qualify for an ENTHUSE Bursary of £480 from the National STEM Learning Centre (NSLC) which will cover registration and accommodation costs associated with the course.

    Further details are available here.

     

    Book courses online

     

    Coming up


    DelegateWelcome to the area of the SSERC website on which you will find details of our professional development support for chemistry.

     

    In SSERC we are proud of the quality and the variety of courses which we offer to teachers of chemistry and we recognise the need for professional development opportunities which focus on offering support at a time of significant curriculum change.

     

    Within SSERC we have developed a range of courses which focus on practical, hands-on activities that are easily applied in the classroom. Our course offerings range from early secondary to Advanced Higher and we offer both residential and non-residential opportunities.

     

    Chemistry Probationers

    For 2017/2018 SSERC has teamed up with the Royal Society of Chemistry on a new initiative through which chemistry probationers will have the opportunity of taking part in a 2-part residential programme of professional development. Coupled to this is the opportunity for you to work alongside a dedicated mentor who will be able to support you during your first year of teaching. The initiative is funded by the Royal Society of Chemistry with support from a number of agencies including SSERC - more details are available here.  The available funding only allows us to provide this opportunity to a total of 30 probationers during the 2017/2018 academic session.  If you would like to take part, then please speak with your Local Authority Probationer Manager to establish whether your involvement can be arranged and then complete the expression of interest form which is available on the SSERC website.

     

    Book course online here

     
    Please contact us (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.) for more information on any of our courses or to discuss bespoke courses which can be offered.

     

     

     

     

    Coming up

    Biology home 2Welcome to the area of the SSERC website on which you will find details of our professional development support for biology.

     

    In SSERC we are proud of the quality and the variety of courses which we offer to teachers of Biology and we recognise the need for professional development opportunities which focus on offering support at a time of significant curriculum change.

     

    Within SSERC we have developed a range of courses which focus on practical, hands-on activities that are easily applied in the classroom. Our course offerings range from early secondary to Advanced Higher and we offer both residential and non-residential opportunities.

     

    Delegates at the Biology Summer School are eligible to receive grants to support their attendance. If you are teaching in a Local Authority funded-school in Scotland you will qualify for an ENTHUSE Bursary from The National STEM Learning Centre (NSLC) which will cover registration and accommodation costs associated with the courses. Further details of ENTHUSE Bursaries can be found on the NSLC website or by requesting information from SSERC (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.).  

     

    Skills for Work: Laboratory Science National 5

    A new course, Skills for Work: Laboratory Science National 5, has recently been introduced into schools and colleges in Scotland. 

    Our consultations with colleagues in schools and colleges indicate that Laboratory Science National 5 is often taught by an individual teacher who may lack detailed subject knowledge in aspects outside their own area(s) of expertise. We plan to support the Laboratory Science National 5 course by offering participants the opportunity to explore laboratory procedures and practices which can be used in delivery across the course.

    If you are teaching or working as a technician in a Local Authority funded-school in Scotland you will qualify for an ENTHUSE Bursary of £480 from the National STEM Learning Centre (NSLC) which will cover registration and accommodation costs associated with the course.

    Further details are available here.

     

    Please contact us (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.) for more information on any of our courses or to discuss bespoke courses which can be offered.

     

    Book courses online

     

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    Welcome to the area of the SSERC website on which you will find details of our professional development support for technology.

     

    In SSERC we are proud of the quality and the variety of courses which we offer to teachers of Technology and we recognise the need for professional development opportunities which focus on offering support at a time of significant curriculum change.

     

    Within SSERC we have developed a range of courses which focus on practical, hands-on activities that are easily applied in the classroom. Our course offerings range from early secondary to Advanced Higher and we offer both residential and non-residential opportunities.

     

    Please contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to vius (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.) for more information on any of our provision or to discuss bespoke courses which can be offered.

     

    Book courses online 

     

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    three UV

     

    Welcome to the area of the SSERC website on which you will find details of our professional development support for primary teachers.

     

    In SSERC we are proud of the quality and the variety of courses which we offer to primary teachers and we recognise the need for professional development opportunities which focus on offering support at a time of significant curriculum change.

     

    Within SSERC we have developed a range of courses which focus on practical, hands-on activities that are easily applied in the classroom. Our course offerings range from early years up to and including the primary-secondry transition and we offer both residential and non-residential opportunities.

     

    Delegates on our residential CPD courses are eligible to receive a grant to support their attendance. If you are teaching in a Local Authority funded-school in Scotland you will qualify for an ENTHUSE Award from the National STEM Learning Centre (NSLC) which will cover registration and accommodation costs associated with the courses. Further details of ENTHUSE Awards can be found on the NSLC website or by requesting information from SSERC (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.).

     

    You may also want to check out the Cookalong GlowMeet courses at SSERC.

     

    C address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

     

    Please contactThis email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to vius (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.) for more information on any of our provision or to discuss bespoke courses which can be offered.

     

    Book courses online 

     

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    For many years SSERC has offered a range of professional development opportunities to support technicians and on this part of the website you will find details of the courses offered together with information on how to apply/regsiter your interest.  At a time of major curriculum change there has never been a more important role for technicians within our schools and colleges and within SSERC we are proud of the quality and scope of our training portfolio.

     

    In addition to a range of bespoke opportunities (contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. for more details), SSERC has, in partnership with the Scottish Technicians Advisory Group (STAG), developed a number of courses which have been levelled and credit-rated by SQA. A brief description of the each of the courses, together with an indication of the number of credits awarded upon successful completion, is given below.

     

    Introductory Chemistry for Technical Support Staff (2 SCQF points, Level 5) 

    This unit is designed to provide learners with the knowledge and skills required to enable them to perform simple practical chemical procedures. It is suitable for learners with limited or no knowledge of chemical procedures as carried out in an educational context. By the end of this unit the learner will be able to:

    • Demonstrate knowledge and understanding related to school chemical laboratory equipment and its safe use.
    • Demonstrate understanding of chemical measuring techniques and preparation of solutions.

     

    Chemical Handling (2 SCQF points, Level 5)

    This unit is designed to provide learners with detailed knowledge and skills for performing practical chemical handling procedures. This unit is suitable for learners who are performing chemical handling procedures and glass working in an educational context. On completion of the unit the learner should be able to: 

    • Demonstrate knowledge and understanding related to safe practice in preparing chemicals.
    • Safely prepare and dispose of chemicals used in schools.
    • Safely prepare glass tubing and rod.

      

    Introductory Physics for Technical Support Staff (2 SCQF points, Level 5) 

    This unit is designed to provide learners with the knowledge and skills required to enable them to set up and operate equipment used in a physics laboratory. It is suitable for learners with limited or no knowledge of physics equipment used in secondary schools. By the end of this unit the learner will be able to:

    • Demonstrate knowledge and understanding related to school physics laboratory equipment and its safe use.
    • Demonstrate understanding of how to set up physics equipment, measuring techniques and basic fault finding.

     

     Introduction to Microscope Maintenance and Use (2 SCQF points, Level 5) 

    This unit is designed to provide learners with knowledge and skills to use and carry out simple maintenance procedures and use of educational microscopes. The unit is suitable for learners with a limited or no knowledge of microscopy procedures as carried out in an educational context. By the end of this unit the learner will be able to:

    • Demonstrate knowledge and understanding related to the routine maintenance and proper use of school microscopes.
    • Identify and use the correct procedures to prepare microscope slides in carrying out simple biological investigations.

      

    Safe Use of Fixed Workshop Machinery (2 SCQF points, Level 5)

    The purpose of this unit is to instruct learners on the safe use of bandsaws, circular saws and planer thicknessers. The unit also aims to instruct learners on the safe procedures for carrying out associated tasks such as blade changing and the inspection and cleaning of dust extraction systems. The course is suitable for learners who have completed a craft apprenticeship or have previous training/experience in using the equipment.  By the end of this unit the learner will be able to:

    • Demonstrate knowledge and understanding related to the safe use of the bandsaw, circular saw and planer thicknesser.

     

    Maintenance of Fixed Workshop Machinery and Tools (3 SCQF points, Level 6)

    This unit is designed to instruct learners on the safe methods of implementing a maintenance programme for hand tools, power tools, fixed machines, dust extraction and emergency stop system. By the end of this unit the learner will be able to: 

    • Demonstrate knowledge and understanding related to the safe implementation of maintenance programmes for hand tools and machinery in technical department workshops

     

    Safety in Microbiology for Schools (3 SCQF points, Level 6)

    This unit is designed to provide learners with detailed knowledge and skills for performing practical microbiological procedures. This unit is suitable for learners who are performing microbiological procedures in an educational context. On completion of the unit the learner should be able to:

    • Demonstrate knowledge and understanding related to microbiological techniques
    • Safely perform microbiological techniques

     

    Electrical Safety and Portable Appliance Testing in Schools (2 SCQF points, Level 6) 

    This unit is designed to provide learners with detailed knowledge and skills for performing practical electrical safety procedures and portable appliance testing. This unit is suitable for learners who are performing electrical safety procedures in an educational context. On completion of the unit the learner should be able to:

    • Demonstrate knowledge and understanding related to electrical safety.
    • Understand basic electrical theory and safely perform equipment electrical testing

     

    Further information on all of our courses for technicians can be obtained by contacting us at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

     

     

    Coming up

     

    Welcome to the area of the SSERC website where you will find details of our professional development programmes for Principal Teachers, Curriculum Leaders and Heads of Faculty.


    At a time of significant curriculum change, strong and effective leadership is required across many areas of schools and colleges. The leadership programmes offered by SSERC focus on individuals who have, or aspire to have, a leadership role in support of the sciences.


    SSERC provides two courses in leadership: Leading for Excellence in Science and Curriculum Leaders and Heads of Faculty. These two part residential courses require participants to carry a 'gap task' between parts one and two. These courses are complimentary to each other and can be taken in any order. Leading for Excellence in Science is normally offered every year and Currculum Leaders and Heads of Faculty every two years. More details on these course can found found on our CPD pages.


    The external evaluation of SSERC's Support for Science Education in Scotland through CPD made the observation that:

    Promoted staff who have undertaken SSERC leadership CPD are even more likely than their collegues to have played a significant role in science developments at departmental and school level.


    Our Leadership courses are supported through funding from a variety of sources including the Scottish Government and the National STEM Learning Centre (NSLC). If you are teaching in a Local Authority funded-school in Scotland you may qualify for an ENTHUSE Award from NSLC which will cover registration and accommodation costs associated with attendance at our Leadership courses. Further details of ENTHUSE Awards can be found on the NSLC websiteor by requesting information from SSERC (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.).


    The Leading for Excellence in Science program has been awarded full accreditation by the General Teaching Council for Scotland under its Professional Recognition scheme.


    Coming up

     

    gals 2012Welcome to the area of the SSERC website on which you will find details of our professional development support for Probationers and newly-qualified teachers.

     

    As you embark on your career in teaching it is important that you recognise and, wherever possible, take advantage of the range of professional development opportunities that are open to you. At SSERC we have developed a range of courses which focus on practical, hands-on activities that are easily applied in the classroom. Some of our courses are specifically targeted at Probationer teachers in both the Primary and Secondary sectors. 

     

    Many of our courses are supported through funding from a variety of sources including the Scottish Government and the National STEM Learning Centre (NSLC). If you are teaching in a Local Authority funded-school in Scotland you will qualify for an ENTHUSE Award from NSLC which will cover registration and accommodation costs associated with the course. Further details of ENTHUSE can be found on the NSLC website or by requesting information from SSERC - This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

     

    We hope that many of our other courses will also be of interest to you – check the appropriate subject area page for further details.

     

    Coming up

    Kirsty beaker

    SSERC promotes the principles of Sensible Risk Management as promulgated by the Health and Safety Executive.

     

    Sensible risk management is about: 

    • Ensuring that workers and the public are properly protected
    • Providing overall benefit to society by balancing benefits and risks, with a focus on reducing real risks – both those which arise more often and those with serious consequences
    • Enabling innovation and learning not stifling them
    • Ensuring that those who create risks manage them responsibly and understand that failure to manage real risks responsibly is likely to lead to robust action
    • Enabling individuals to understand that as well as the right to protection, they also have to exercise responsibility

     

    Sensible risk management is not about:  

    • Creating a totally risk free society
    • Generating useless paperwork mountains
    • Scaring people by exaggerating or publicising trivial risks
    • Stopping important recreational and learning activities for individuals where the risks are managed
    • Reducing protection of people from risks that cause real harm and suffering

     

    SSERC believes that it is important that risks are managed responsibly and sensibly. We believe that health and safety legislation should not be a barrier to the provision of valuable learning experiences for young people and we offer a range of training courses and guidance materials which discourage bureaucratic and over-complex methods of risk management.

     

    Please contact (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.) This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.us for more information on any of our health and safety courses or to discuss tailored programmes which can be offered.  In addition to those listed below, we offer a range of award-bearing courses for technicians and further details can be found here.

     

    Book courses online

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    in school wee

    Welcome to the area of the SSERC website on which you will find details of our online professional development opportunities - SSERC_Meets for primary teachers.

    In March 2011 SSERC offered its first online professional development activity using Glow as the platform for delivery. Since that time we have extended the range and scope of the activities which are offered in this format.

    We will be running a number of SSERC_Meets during this session and further details of these can be accessed by following the links below. Applications can be made online from links within the information about the individual SSERC_Meets. If your application is successful you will be contacted shortly after the closing date at which time full details of how to access the SSERC_Meet wil be provided

    How a SSERC_Meet works

    At present we are using the Adobe Connect platform to broadcast our SSERC_Meets. Only 20 schools can be accepted for each SSERC_Meet

    If your application is successful you will be asked to agree to the Terms & Conditions for participation in the SSERC_Meet and thereafter your school will be sent a box of resources which are specifically tailored to support the activities of the SSERC_Meet you applied for. Your school is required to participate in the live event on the day and we will ask you to submit a sign-in sheet listing all participants in your school. Each participant is then required to complete a short online Evaluation Form within 2 weeks of the date of the SSERC_Meet.

    This course has no fee. All we ask in return is that you and each of your colleagues fill in one of our short online evaluation forms in order that we can refine and improve this exciting way of delivering CLPL for the future.

    We hope to welcome you on a future SSERC_Meet and, in the meantime, if you have any questions, please don't hesitate to get in touch.

    We hope to welcome you on a future SSERC GlowMeet Cookalong and, in the meantime, if you have any questions, please don't hesitate to get in touch.

    This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.         


    Book courses online 

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    RCUK 1Contemporary science topics fascinate students as they are perceived as exciting and controversial and help students to engage with cutting edge, real-world problems. Experience of such topics can change attitudes and affect future career choices.

     

    As scientific developments and advancements progress so rapidly, it is important to give teachers the opportunity to remain excited and engaged with their subject.  SSERC is delighted to have been invited by the National STEM Learning Centre (NSLC) and Research Councils UK (RCUK) to act as their agent in Scotland and provide a suite of courses for teachers. This programme is designed to deliver the latest knowledge, new contexts and practical activities to support teachers in delivering the curriculum in accessible, enjoyable and stimulating ways for all.

     

    NSLCThe programme of high quality has been developed in partnership with leading researchers working at the cutting edge of contemporary science. Courses are delivered by personnel from SSERC with support from the researchers themselves. The courses focus on recent advances in scientific research and will enable teachers to improve their knowledge and understanding of the fundamental science concepts underlying the research in contexts linked to the curriculum.

     

    Each course is a one-day event and the fee is £180. Participants are eligible to receive grants of £180 to support their attendance. If you are teaching in a Local Authority funded school in Scotland you will qualify for a Contemporary Science (RCUK) Award from NSLC which will cover the registration fee, refreshments and course materials. In some cases additional materials to support classroom implementation of activities will be provided. Further details of Contemporary Science (RCUK) Awards can be found on the NSLC website or by requesting information from SSERC (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.).

     

    Book courses online 

    Coming up

     

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    SSERC plays host to a number of meetings and conferences.  Details of such events can be found on this page.

     

    SSERC's 2017 Science and Technology Conference is due to be held on Friday 1st December 2017.  Further details are available from the link below.

    Welcome to the Primary Science & Technology Home Page.

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    News Home Page - suggestions for layout please :-)

    SSERC publishes materials in a range of formats and brief details follow together with information on how to access the various documents.


    Health and Safety Publications

    An important aspect of the work of SSERC is to offer health and safety advice for schools and colleges.  SSERC has published a range of guidelines and documents in support of this area and these can be accessed either via the Subject Area pages or by registered members through our Health & Safety page.


    Bulletins

    Bulletin 261 cover

    We publish (four times each year) newsletters for the secondary and primary sectors. The focus of the articles varies with each issue but ideas for practical work together with advice on health and safety matters are always covered.


    NOTE :- When following health & safety or equipment advice you should be aware of when the advice was published e.g. Bulletins from a number of years ago will only contain advice that was applicable at that time  For up-to-date advice concerning health & safety please follow the links advised in Health & Safety on the Main Menu. If you are at all unsure please contact SSERC.



    Subject Area Publications

    Each Subject Area within SSERC publishes a range of Articles/resources (including video materials) that support learning and teaching across primary and secondary. Check out the Subject Area pages or registered members may use the search facility to help locate items of interest.


    Statistics for School Biology Experiments and Advanced Higher Projects

    We are delighted to announce that SSERC has recently published ‘Statistics for School Biology Experiments and Advanced Higher Projects’. This guide has been written by Graeme Ruxton (Professor of Biology at the University of St Andrews) and Jim Stafford (Senior Associate with SSERC). Graeme has a particular interest in making the principles of experimental design and the use of statistics in analysing experimental results accessible to the widest range of learners including school students and his book Experimental Design for the Life Sciences influenced the development of the Investigative Biology Unit of Advanced Higher Biology. Jim has been a Principal Teacher of Biology, a Local Authority Science Adviser and Quality Improvement Officer.  During his career Jim has worked with various partner organisations on a number of areas of science education, including leadership training, health and safety guidance, and the development of national qualifications in biology.

    Copies of the guide can be downloaded here. Additional printed copies, at a cost of £3 each to include postage and packing, are available. To order, please supply a purchase order number and we will arrange for copies to be sent to you on receipt. Orders can be submitted to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..


    Advanced Higher Biology Project Investigations

    We are pleased to announce that SSERC has recently published ‘Advanced Higher Biology Project investigations’. This guide has been written by Jim Stafford who is a Senior Associate with SSERC. Previously Jim has been a Principal Teacher of Biology, a Local Authority Science Adviser and Quality Improvement Officer.  In his foreword to the guide, Professor Iain Hunter (Executive Dean of Science at the University of Strathclyde), writes:

    ’This Guide, from SSERC, fills a much-needed gap for both student and teacher. It provides generic guidance and support for both. It will be invaluable in detuning the anxiety of the Investigation, and enhancing the student experience and attainment’.

    Copies of the guide can be downloaded here. Additional printed copies, at a cost of £5 each to include postage and packing, are available. To order, please supply a purchase order number and we will arrange for copies to be sent to you on receipt. Orders can be submitted to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.


    Biology Book Reviews

    The aim of this section of the website is to house occasional reviews of 'popular science' books in biology.  As a result of the new areas of biology that have been introduced to the Revised and CfE Higher Biology, Higher Human Biology and Advanced Higher Biology courses these books can provide teachers with useful background to the new science they will encounter in these courses.  Access the reviews here.


    Articles from the literature

    A number of articles have been published in the scientific/educational literature and copies are available from the authors. Access the list of articles here.



    Other publications available from SSERC



    SSERC Bulletins are listed on the left-hand menu, first by year and then by numerical order. The most recent Bulletins are shown below. We have now made all of the Bulletin content from SSERC's 50 year history available in electronic form i.e. in individually searchable PDF form. However, although you can search within the text of early PDFs you cannot search for that text via the site Search engine as yet. All of the contents titles are available to search.

    As of June 2014, all bulletins older than 1 year will be open access so you will not need to log in to find things.

    NOTE :- When following health & safety or equipment advice you should be aware of when the advice was published e.g. Bulletins from a number of years ago will only contain advice that was applicable at that time  For up-to-date advice concerning health & safety please follow the links advised in Health & Safety on the Main Menu. If you are at all unsure please contact SSERC.

    SSERC Bulletins from  2017

     SSERC Bulletins from  2016

     

     

    Bulletin 236 [Summer 2011] Bulletin 237 [Autumn 2011]
    235 236 237
    Bulletin 230 [Spring 2010] Bulletin 231 [Late Spring 2010] Bulletin 232 [Summer 2010] Bulletin 233 [Autumn 2010] Bulletin 234 [Winter 2010/11]
    230 231 232 233 234

    Bulletin 232 [Summer 2010]Bulletin 232 complete [PDF - 10.8 MB] - [Summer 2010]

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    Bulletin 233 [Autumn 2010] 233 - Complete [PDF - 11.77 MB]

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    Bulletin 227 [Spring 2009] Bulletin 228 [Summer 2009] Bulletin 229 [Autumn 2009]
    227 228 229
    Bulletin 220 [Spring 2007] Bulletin 221 [Summer 2007] Bulletin 222 [Autumn 2007] Bulletin 223 [Winter 2007]
    220 221 222 223

    Gordon Moore and Anne Adams at the Biotechnology Summer School in Edinburgh in 1997. Anne sadly died in February 2011.

    Gordon Moore and Anne Adams at the Biotechnology Summer School in Edinburgh in 1997.

    Anne sadly died in February 2011.

    Bulletin 221 [Summer 2007]Bulletin 221 complete [PDF - 676 KB]

    Bulletin 220 [Spring 2007]Bulletin 220 complete [PDF - 1.09 MB]

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    1 Conference - Towards a Science Nation
    2 Physics - Optics with LED sources
    4 Summer Schools 2007
    5 Chemistry - Traffic lights
    6 Chemistry - Equilibrium continued
    7 ICT - SnagIT
    8 Index to SSERC Bulletins 211 - 219
    10 Safety - Are laboratories with peripheral benching safe & fit for purpose
    11 Safety - Lampholders
    12 SSERC Shop - Surplus Equipment Offers

    Bulletin 216 [Spring 2006] Bulletin 217 [Summer 2006] Bulletin 218 [Autumn 2006] Bulletin 219 [Winter 2006]
    216 217 218 219

    SSERC move to Pitreavie, Dunfermline in March 2006

    SSERC move to Pitreavie, Dunfermline in March 2006

    Bulletin 219 [Winter 2006]Bulletin 219 complete [PDF - 1.15 MB]

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    1 News - David McGrouther - appreciation
    2 Biology - SAPS Photosynthesis Kit - use of algal balls to investigate photosynthesis
    5 Prestige autoclaves - special offer
    6 Chemistry - Equilibrium and Le Châtelier
    7 Chemistry - Electric writing
    8 CPD News - Update, ISE 5-14 through CPD draws to a close
    10 Physics - Radiant heaters
    11 CPD News - Scottish Technicians’ Consultative Conference (2006)
    12 ICT - Further experiments
    12 Safety - Wiring plugs - banned or not?

    Bulletin 218 [Autumn 2006]Bulletin 218 complete [PDF - 1.16 MB]

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    1 News - Smoking machines in schools
                - Is science uncool?

    2 ICT - Physics - Audacity - adopt an audacious approach to the study of sound

    6 Supporting Scottish Science Education - CPD news

    8 Physics - Half-life demonstrations

    Bulletin 217 [Summer 2006]Bulletin 217 complete [PDF - 1.13 MB]

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    1 News - SafetyNet surfaces, Retirals
    2 News - WEEE & R, errata (216)
    3 News - RoHS & Appendices
    4 Physics - Electric circuit model
    5 Safety - Security of radioactive holdings
    6 Safety - A sourcespotter’s guide
    7 Chemistry - Ammonium molybdate test for phosphate
    8 5-14 - Forensics practical investigations
    9 Biology - Smoking machine revisted
    10 SSERC Shop - Equipment & Publications

    Bulletin 216 [Spring 2006]Bulletin 216 complete [PDF - 1.06 MB]

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    1 Life begins in Fife
    Physics— Prism experiments
    2 Physics - Experimenting with LSD and a prism
    7 Chemistry - An Oscillating Reaction
    8 Chemistry - Invisible Writing
    9 Chemistry - Chemiluminescence
    10 Biology - Aid to filtering protoplasts
    10 Biology- Prestige Autoclaves notice
    11 Biology -Environmental Monitoring - Market Survey
    12 Safety - Revised Lab Safety Guide

    B 214 Bulletin 215 [Autumn 2005]
    214 215

    Bulletin 215 [Autumn 2005]Bulletin 215 complete [PDF - 1 MB]

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    1 Editorial - Life begins?
    3 Quote Quiz
    4 Contacts at SSERC & CPD Projects
    5 Annual Conference/AGM
    6 Support Materials for Teachers & Technicians
    7 Safety - Alas, more lost sources
    8 Chemistry - Thionin
    9 Biology - Cabomba, an alternative to Elodea?

    Bulletin 214 [Spring 2005]Bulletin 214 complete [PDF - 1 MB]

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    1 CPD Grant Awards
    2 Online Discussion Forum for Technicians
    2 TradeNews
    3 A safer Buiret Reagent
    3 Radiation News
    4 Data projectors and whiteboards - are they a risk to eyesight?
    6 Science investigations with a PVA polymer
    8 Spark Discharge Apparatus - Test Report
    9 News & Comment
    10 Fuel Cell Car & Experiment Kit - Test Report
    11 Summer Schools 2005

    Bulletin 210 [Spring 2004] Bulletin 211 [Summer 2004] Bulletin 212 [Autumn 2004] Bulletin 213 [Winter 2004]
    210 211 212 213

    Bulletin 212 [Autumn 2004]Bulletin 213 complete [PDF - 968 KB]

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    1 Risk Assessment
       EssentialTools
    2 Assessing Risks
    6 “Reasonably Practicable”
    7 Not proven
    8 DSEAR
    9 Using computers safely
    10 Investigating compost formation
    12 Risk assessment for compost formation

    B 212Bulletin 212 complete [PDF - 1.07 MB]

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    1 Editorial
    2 Safety
    4 Chemistry Summer School
    5 ISE 5-14 - Planning Spreadsheet
    6 Chemistry
    8 Physics! Chemistry
    11 Biology / Microbiology
    12 SSERC AGM / Open courses

    Bulletin 211 [Summer 2004]Bulletin 211 complete [PDF - 936 KB]

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    1 & 12 Editorial
    2 Safety guidance on radioactivity
    6 Recirculatory fume cupboards
    8 SCOTS Online
    8 Safety
    10 Microbiology & biotechnology at levels E & F
    12 Safety

    Bulletin 210 [Spring 2004]Bulletin 210 complete [PDF - 1.2 MB]

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    1 Editorial
    2 News &comment
    3 Safety responsibilities and management
       Wood dust and health surveillance
    6 Flicker and photo sensitive epilepsy
    7 Colour mixing
    10 Auroral displays
    11 Blue-bottle redox reactions
    12 Magical mushrooms
    13 Index
    16 Trade News

    Bulletin 208 [Spring 2003] Bulletin 209 [Summer 2003]
    208 209

    Bulletin 209 [Summer 2003]Bulletin 209 complete [PDF - 981 KB]

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    1 Editorial
    2 News & comment
    3 Safety Notes
    4 Electrical isolation
    6 Never mind the gas
    7 Starch synthesis
    8 Come fly with me
    9 Protist kit
    10 Robot arm
    12 TV photo show
    13 Chemistry news
        Technicians’News
    14 Substitutes for peanuts
    15 Algal cells
    16 News, Trade News

    Bulletin 208 [Spring 2003]Bulletin 208 complete [PDF - 1.24 MB]

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    1 Editorial
    2 News & comment
    3 UV risk assessment
    4 HT safety
    7 UV lightbox
    8 WPA colorimeter
    9 Photographic flash with a neon
    10 Composition of air with pyrogallol
    12 Constant humidity solutions
    13 Finding Planck’s constant with LEDs
    15 Technical Tips
    16 Trade News

    Bulletin 204 [Spring 2002] Bulletin 205 [Summer 2002] Bulletin 206 [Autumn 2002] Bulletin 207 [Winter 2002]
    204 205 206 207

    Bulletin 207 [Winter 2002]Bulletin 207 complete [PDF - 1.33 MB]

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    1 Editorial
    2 News & comment
    3 Health effects of low-level radiation
    7 HSE guidance
    8 PIC & LCD display
    9 Solution bumping
    10 Anodising
         Radio transmitter
    11 Laser offer
    12 Radiation detectors
    13 Newl ICT packages
    14 Floras
    15 Phenomendogy
    16 Trade News

    Bulletin 206 [Autumn 2002]Bulletin 206 complete [PDF - 1.19 MB]

    Zipped images

    1 Editorial
    2 News & comment
    3 Electrical equipment testing
    4 Superwool 607
    6 CE Marking and product safety
    7 Radford Labpacks,
       Liquid nitrogen transport,
       Traffic light LEDs.
    8 Microscopes
    10 Control atSl/S2
    12 Buffers
    13 Power supplies
    14 LED array
    15 UVLEDs
    16 Technical tip,Trade News, Addresses.

    Bulletin 205 [Summer 2002]Bulletin 205 complete [PDF - 1.2 MB]

    Zipped images

    1 Editorial
    2 News & comment
    3 Gas cylinders and regulators
    4 Van de Graaff shocks
    6 Brady’s reagent
    7 Texas datalogger
    9 Graphical Analysis
    10 Anodising aluminium
    11 Microbiology resources
    12 Microscope illumination
    13 Constant spring motor
    14 Laser diode modules
    15 UVLEDs
    16 Trade news, Contact lens retraction

    Bulletin 204 [Spring 2002]Bulletin 204 complete [PDF - 764 KB]

    Zipped images

    1 Editorial
    2 News & comment
    3 Laser attack
    4 Transformation Kit
       Disinfectants
       COSHH
    5 Strain gauges
       Radio Receiver
    6 PlC products from Revolution
    7 Contact lens risk
    8 Redox reactions
      The Thiele tube
    10 Biotech Summer School
    11 Reagents
    12 News & comment

    Bulletin 201 [Spring 2001] Bulletin 202 [Summer 2001] Bulletin 203 [Autumn 2001]
    201 202 203

    Bulletin 203 [Autumn 2001]Bulletin 203 complete [PDF - 761 KB]

    Zipped images

    1 Editorial
    2 News &comment
    3 LED safety
       Agar Agony Aunt
    4 Equipment funding survey
    9 Bacterial endospores
    10 Hazardous Chemicals Manual - new edition
    11 Pressure Systems
    12 News, tips and No Comment

    Bulletin 202 [Summer 2001]Bulletin 202 complete [PDF - 953 KB]

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    1 Editorial
    2 News
    3 Safety
    4 lCT Survey
    8 Safety note on gloves
    9 Conducting polymers
    11 Air-free small scale reductions
    12 Galileo’s inclined plane
    14 Micro biology
    15 Rokit safety
    16Trade News

    Bulletin 201 [Spring 2001]Bulletin 201 complete [PDF - 647 KB]

    Zipped images

    1 Editorial
    2 News & comment
    3 Electrical accident
    4 Prosecution
    5 Safety references
    6 DiVA spectro photometer
    7 Laser sensor
       Polarisation experiments
    8 Photoelectric effect kits
    10 Benedict’s solution

    Bulletin 199 [Summer 2000] Bulletin 200 [Winter 2000]
    199 200

    Bulletin 200 [Winter 2000]Bulletin 200 complete [PDF - 3.29 MB]

    Zipped images

    News and comment Apology - technical DTP difficulties, Dates for diary, Junk Emails 1
    Pearls before swine, SQA debacle, Bulletin back issues 2
    A recipe for CPD 15
    Endpiece(s) 30
    Safety Notes HSEupdate on MDF 3
    Replacement for BS 5304 3
    Health and Safety in D&T 3
    Health and safety law - update 3
    Safety sources for technology 13
    Prosecution after technology incident 13
    Active braking, workshop machinery 14
    Pressure systems 14
    Leaflet for governors, school boards and heads 25
    Work experience - organiser’s guide 25
    Mobile ‘phones 25
    Safe use of gas cylinders 25
    Equipment Notes Balance review 4
    Gas pressure apparatus 16
    Trade News Glass gas syringes, 3-way stopcocks, DJB microtech 26
    Equipment offers 27
    Index, Bulletins 190 to 200 31

    Front cover illustration Artist’s impression - aerial view of the Glasgow Science Centre complex with IMAX cinema and revolving tower Pacific Quay, Glasgow. IMAX open now, Science Centre due to open Spring 2001.

    Bulletin 199 [Summer 2000]Bulletin 199 complete [PDF - 2.15 MB]

    Zipped images

    News and comment Penultimate bulletin issue in present format
    More on the web, NOF Training, Dundee Science Centre, Other science centres
    SSERC Website 2
    Science Strategy Report 27
    Publications 9, 33
    Safety Notes Solder flux fume control 3
    lonising Radiations Regulations 1999 4
    Protactinium generator 5
    False nails - fire hazards in the lab 6
    Revised Management Regulations 7
    Educational use of E.coIi 7
    Enzymes - hazards and labelling 26
    ICT Notes Software review - Data Studio I 0
    Biology Notes Thermistor circuits with a PC 8
    Bioreactors - an update I 2
    Equipment Notes Gas law experiments: Part 3: Boyle’s law I 8
    - PASCO Pressure Sensor
    - PASCO Gas Law Experimenter
    - PASCO Heat Engine
    - STE Boyle’s Law Apparatus
    - Philip Harris Boyle’s Law Apparatus
    Microscale Vacuum Apparatus 22
    - Density of air determination
    - Boyle’s law with a marshmallow
    Technical Notes Adapting Unilab light gates for a PASCO interface 9
    Pressure and depth in fluids 28
    Unilab I 3 V Stepped Power Supply 29
    Signal generators and capacitative loads 30
    Diffraction gratings - Don’t believe what it says 3 I
    Slime - What’s that? 32
    Technician Notes Modern apprenticeships for laboratory technicians in education 33
    Equipment offers 34

    Bulletin 196 [Spring 1999] Bulletin 197 [Autumn 1999] Bulletin 198 [Winter 1999]
    196 197 198

    Bulletin 198 [Winter 1999]Bulletin 198 complete [PDF - 1.69 MB]

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    News and comment Approved Training Provider status 1
    Support agency ratings 1
    SAPS secondee 1
    Biotechnology summer school 1
    ASE Scotland annual meeting 1
    Editorial That old feng shui factor 2
    CT Notes ICT needs and science subjects 3
    CPD Notes ICT in the Sciences 5
    Equipment Notes Gas law experiments: Part 2 6
    - STE Jolly’s Bulb and Gauge 7
    - Nicholl Absolute Zero Apparatus 8
    - PASCO Pressure Sensor 8
    - PASCO Temperature Sensor 9
    - PASCO Gas Law Experimenter 9
    - PASCO Heat Engine 10
    Practical work with lOT 13
    BASIC Stamp: Part 3 15
    Colorimeter review 20
    - Griffin Colorimeter Model 41 22
    - Harris S-Range Colorimeter 24
    - WPA Colorimeter C075 26
    Biotechnology Notes SAPS Biotechnology Scotland : Vacancy 19
    Technical Notes Higher Physics: Electricity: Activity 21 28
    Odd and ends New resources and equipment 29
    Equipment offers 30

    Bulletin 196 [Spring 1999]Bulletin 196 complete [PDF - 2.36 MB]

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    Introduction 1
    Opinion IT butters no turnips? 2
    No comment, etc 2,33
    Safety Notes Extension leads 3
    Lasers, more misuse 4
    Six pack changes 4
    Solder flux fume 26
    Health and safety policies 34
    Fume cupboard testing 34
    Be safe! (re)reprinted 34
    Clear phenolic disinfectants 34
    Snorers and solvents 34
    Feature Articles SSERCNet - ICT Development News 5
    SSAG Advisory Notes - ICT in Science Education 9
    Equipment Notes Projectile launcher 14
    New pupil oscilloscope 20
    PASCO interfaces and the iMac 33
    Technical Notes Simple science surfer’s guide 13
    and Tips Problems with Benedict’s reagent 22
    MOSFETs, diodes and photodiodes 30
    Simple light gates 36
    Biological bits Development officer 25
    Sixth year tips 25
    - effects of lead
    - ideas for projects
    POST report summaries (again) 25
    Trade News Stop press Irwin Desman in receivership 37
    Equipment Offers 38

    Bulletin 193 [Spring 1998] Bulletin 194 [Summer 1998] Bulletin 195 [Autumn 1998]
    193 194 195
    SSERC Bulletin 190 [Spring 1997] SSERC Bulletin 191 [Summer 1997] SSERC Bulletin 192 [Autumn 1997]
    190 191 192

    coverBulletin 190 complete [PDF - 1.3 MB]

    Zipped images

    News and Comment Smurfin’ SSERC 1
    Learned Societies - educational meetings
    Institute of Biology 1
    Royal Society of Chemistry 1
    Institute of Physics 1
    Biotechnology - teachers’ conference 1
    Scottish biotechnology project 1
    More ramblings 2
    No comment 2
    More comment 20
    How to find us Location map for SSERC 3
    Safety Notes Air rifle experiments 4
    Microwave ovens 5
    Liquid nitrogen 6
    Accident report: Unilab Klystron Power Supply 8
    False economies (technician support and safety) 9
    Mercury exposure 10
    Lack of training - a cause of accidents 1 0
    Technical Tips Wrongly polarised plotting compasses 11
    Extraction solvents for plant and animal lipids 1 9
    Ice hangers (DIY pink elephants) 20
    Chromobacteria 20
    Technical Articles Laser radiation 12
    Equipment Notes Oscilloscopes 21
    Equipment Offers 26
    Cumulative index Index to Bulletin Issues 180-1 89 29
    lOB Meeting Booking form 32

    SSERC Bulletin 187 [Spring 1996] SSERC Bulletin 188 [Summer 1996]  SSERC Bulletin 189 [Autumn 1996]
    187 188 189

    SSERC moved to St. Mary's Land within Moray House in the Autumn of 1996.

    SSERC moved to St. Mary's Land within Moray House, Holyrood Road in the Autumn of 1996.

    SSERC Bulletin 184 [Spring 1995] SSERC Bulletin 185 [Summer 1995] SSERC Bulletin 186 [Autumn1995]
    184 185 186

    SSERC Bulletin 186 [Autumn 1995]Bulletin 186 complete [PDF - 1.6 MB]

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    News and comment 1
    SSERCSOFT news 25
    Technicians’ news 30
    Other news and announcements 32
    Editorial Thirtieth anniversary 3
    Safety Notes Solder fume control 4
    Supervision of practical and project work 26
    COSHH amendments and microbiology 28
    Bovine eyeball dissection 29
    Machine safety : BS EN 292 29
    Be Safe! and Be Safe! INSET pack 29
    Technical Tips Liquid-in-liquid drop formation 11
    Urea : an assay method for investigations 12
    Equipment Notes Portable fume displacement units 10
    Power supplies, Part I 14
    Opinion Gender issues 31
    Trade and Product News 33
    Equipment Offers 34

    SSERC Bulletin 184 [Spring 1995]Bulletin 184 complete [PDF - 1.92 MB]

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    Introduction Leading article and acknowledgements 1
    Materials testing 1
    Comment 1
    Lads o’pairts A celebration of Scottish civil engineering 2
    Safety Notes Portable appliance inspecting 10
    Equipment Notes Materials testing 20
    Erratum etc. Data Harvest 24
    Philip Harris lamps 24
    Announcements
    and notices Managing health and safety 25
    SSERC Graphics for PCs and Macs 25
    Technology Enhancement Programme 25
    Technical Article Electrocardiograph simulator 26
    Loose Ends Protein identification in foods 29
    Phenol oxidases 29
    Express autoclaves 29
    BC lampholders for bench lamps 29
    Surplus equipment offers 30

    SSERC Bulletin 180 [Spring 1994] SSERC Bulletin 181 [Summer 1994] SSERC Bulletin 182 [Autumn 1994] SSERC Bulletin 183 [Winter 1994]
    180 181 182 183

    B 183Bulletin 183 complete [PDF - 1.82 MB]

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    Introduction Dates for the diary, ASE, Awards etc. 1
    Platform The Greenhouse Effect - what should we teach? 2
    Safety Notes
    - Practical work with DNA 4
    Work Equipment Regulations - addendum 7
    Felt-tip pens 8
    Alternative solvents 8
    Plug-top teaching aid 9
    Equipment Notes
    - Interfaces, dataloggers and sensors -
    - a market survey 12
    Kits for digital electronics from JJM 1 6
    Technical articles
    - Timing projectile motion 18
    - Tungsten filament lamp ratings 24
    - Impending gloom? 26
    - Motor speed control - ‘H’ grade
    Technological Studies 28
    Hill reaction 28
    Iodine for starch tests - again 29
    TEP Programme
    An announcement on publications 29
    Surplus equipment offers 30

    B 182Bulletin 182 complete [PDF - 2.65 MB]

    Zipped images

    Foreword Bulletin sponsorship - Engineering Council 1
    Clyde built An appreciation of Scottish engineering 2
    Safety Notes Work Equipment Regulations 10
    Pressure Systems Regulations 13
    Steam engine safety 16
    Equipment Notes Model steam engines 19
    Autoclaves 25
    Centrifuges 29
    Technical articles Tachogenerator applications Part 2 32
    Machine safety 37
    Technical tips Distinguishing glass types 40
    Hydrogen spectrum 41
    Surplus equipment offers 42

    B 180Bulletin 180 complete [PDF - 1.62 MB]

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    Foreword SATROSPHERE 1
    Opinion Right reason, wrong response 2
    Introduction - Environmental Studies 3
    - SSERC training courses 3
    - Robotics competition results 4
    Safety Notes Accident and incident reports
    - exploding Kipps 5
    - sodium incident 5
    - potassium problems 6
    Electrical safety
    - obsolete equipment 6
    - Labpacks, latest episode 7
    COSHH amendments 8
    Transfer chamber incident 8
    Safety in fieldwork publication 9
    Exploding screen cleaner 9
    Feature Article DNA technology kits : A review 10
    Technical Article Hydrolysis of urea: TAPS 3 Investigation 22
    Graphics competition 25
    Surplus equipment offers 26
    Cumulative index to issues 170-179 29

    SSERC Bulletin 176 [March 1993] SSERC Bulletin 177 [June 1993] SSERC Bulletin 178 [Sept. 1993] SSERC Bulletin 179 [Dec. 1993]
    176 177 178 179

    SSERC Bulletin 178 [Sept. 1993]Bulletin 178 complete [PDF - 1.91 MB]

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    Foreword Sponsorship: ScottishPower 1
    Opinion DNA, dinosaurs and dangers 2
    Safety Notes Laboratory acquired infections
    -AIDS and BSE 3
    - Electrothermal heating mantles 9
    Technical Articles Accentuate the experiment
    - lead and enzymes 10
    To measure the length of a metre stick 14
    Equipment Notes Digital multimeters 22
    Plastic rulers 28
    Technical tips That old flame again 30
    Electrolysis of melts 32
    Fun with neodymium
    - Lenz’s Law and Newton 3 34
    Surplus equipment offers 36
    Announcement Software copyright 39
    Trade News 40

    SSERC Bulletin 172 [Jan. 1992] SSERC Bulletin 173 [March 1992] SSERC Bulletin 174 [Aug. 1992] SSERC Bulletin 175 [Oct. 1992]
    172 173 174 175
    SSERC Bulletin 169 [April 1991] SSERC Bulletin 170 [June 1991]  SSERC Bulletin 171 [Oct. 1991]
    169 170 171

    Graeme CPD


    Graeme doing CPD at Bernard Terrace/Lutton Court

     SSERC Bulletin 170 [June 1991]Bulletin 170 complete [PDF - 1.37 MB]

    Introduction
    Safety Notes
    Shell suits - again 3
    Old glass stills 4
    Technical Articles DIY video in biology 4
    Higher Grade Chemistry -
    First ionisation energies 8
    Preparing COSHH Risk Assessments for Project Work in Schools 12
    Opinion II 13
    Equipment Notes Portable appliance testers 14
    Grampian Op-amp Board 23
    Interfacing latest 24
    Opinion III 25
    SSERC Case Studies, Resource File and Teachers’ Guide
    for Higher Grade Technological Studies 26
    Index to Bulletins 160 - 169 27
    Publications 31
    SSERC Graphics Library 32

    SSERC Bulletin 165 [March 1990] SSERC Bulletin 166 [June 1990] SSERC Bulletin 167 [Sept. 1990] SSERC Bulletin 168 [Dec. 1990]
    165 166 167
    168
     SSERC Bulletin 162 [April 1989] SSERC Bulletin 163 [September 1989]  SSERC Bulletin 164 [Dec. 1989]
    162 163 164

    SSERC moved to Bernard Terrace, Edinburgh in May/June 1989

    SSERC moved to Bernard Terrace, Edinburgh in May/June 1989
    This used to be the old Pillans & Wilson printing shop where the exam papers were printed.
    The car park was in Lutton Court.

    Bulletin 159 [March 1998] Bulletin 160 [June 1998] Bulletin 161 [Oct. 1998]
    159 160 161


    Conductivity probes

    DIY conductivity probes from the Chemistry Notes in SSERC Bulletin 159

    Bulletin 160 [June 1998]Bulletin 160 complete [PDF - 585 KB]

    Introduction —Summer Saturdays 1
    —biotechnology symposium 1
    —readers’ letter 1
    Opinion —SEB Panels’ comments on Bulletin 159 2
    Physics Notes —continuous recording of velocity 4
    Safety Notes —the protactinium generator:
    stoppering the flask 7
    Interfacing Notes —software standards 8
    —interfacing publications:
    support for training & users 12
    Bulletin Index —numbers 150 to 159 15

    SSERC Bulletin 155 [Jan. 1987] SSERC Bulletin 156 [March 1987] SSERC Bulletin 157 [May 1987] SSERC Bulletin 158 [Oct. 1987]
    155 156 157
    158

    Jim Jamieson is a guy who just can't help acting on impulse! See Bulletin 155 for more on Grapher and the Unilab interface.

    Jim Jamieson is a guy who just can't help acting on impulse!

    See Bulletin 155 for more on Grapher and the Unilab interface.

     

     

    SSERC Bulletin 149 [Feb. 1986] SSERC Bulletin 150 [March 1986] SSERC Bulletin 151 [May 1986] SSERC Bulletin 152 [June 1986]
    149 150 151
    152
    SSERC Bulletin 153 [Sept. 1986] SSERC Bulletin 154 [Nov. 1986]    
    153 154

    In Bulletin 153 we say goodbye to Ian Downie who, for the last two years, has held a SSSERC Research Fellowship in Microelectronics Applic ations for Schools. Ian left the Centre in mid August, returning across the water to his old authority, Fife.

     

    In Bulletin 153 we said goodbye to Ian Downie who, for two years, held a SSSERC Research Fellowship in Microelectronics Applications for Schools. Ian left the Centre in mid August, returning across the water to his old authority, Fife.

    SSERC Bulletin 150 [March 1986]Bulletin 150 complete [PDF - 1.57 MB]

    Foreword  1
    Introduction  4
    —special edition
    —cover colour  4
    —index  4
    —specialists’ signposts  4
    —RSC offer  4
    CLEAPSE Guides  5
    Environmental Notes  5
    —environmental parameters, in general & pH in particular  5
    —portable magnetic stirrers  8
    —conductivity meters  11
    Physics Notes  14
    —bridge circuits  14
    —active bridges  19
    —applications  21
    —platinum film resistors  21
    —strain gauge  22
    —thermistors  23
    —interfacing  26
    Surplus Equipment  30
    History Notes  31
    Index —bulletins 140 to 149   39

    SSERC Bulletin 144 [Feb. 1985] SSERC Bulletin 145 [April 1985] SSERC Bulletin 146 [June 1985] SSERC Bulletin 147 [Sept. 1985] SSERC Bulletin 148 [Nov. 1985]
    144 145 146
    147
    148

    encoder disc block diagram

    Reflective opto-switch encoder disc and block diagram for shaft encoder in SSERC Bulletin 146

    SSERC Bulletin 139 [Feb. 1984] SSERC Bulletin 140 [April 1984] SSERC Bulletin 141 [June 1984] SSERC Bulletin 142 [Sept. 1984] SSERC Bulletin 143 [Nov. 1984]
    139 140 141
    142
    143

    Computer system - Torch computer linked to BBC Master & Juki daisywheel printer - the first Bulletin to be printed with this system was Bulletin 141

    Computer system - Torch computer linked to BBC Master & Juki daisywheel printer

    The first Bulletin to be printed with this system was Bulletin 141

    SSERC Bulletin 140 [April 1984]Bulletin 140 complete [PDF - 1.4 MB]

    Introduction —surplus equipment
    —Easter closures
    —useful addresses
    Safety Notes —explosion in a fume cupboard
    —ASE announcements
    —HSE Guidance Notes
    Biology Notes —microprojection and CCTV microscopy
    Chemistry Notes —a gaseous equilibrium
    —rubber rings
    Interfacing Notes —BBC analogue port
    —offset zero
    Physics Notes—fibre optics
    In the Workshop
    Surplus Equipment
    Trade News
    Index Bulletins 130-139

    SSERC Bulletin 134 [Feb. 1983] SSERC Bulletin 135 [April 1983] SSERC Bulletin 136 [June 1983] SSERC Bulletin 137 [Sept. 1983] SSERC Bulletin 138 [Nov. 1983]
    134 135 136
    137
    138

    The new old van on the turntable at Broughton Street. John Richardson and Ian Birrell took an exhibition to Orkney in this 'state-of-the-art' luxury transport! Fitted out with Dexion shelving it could do 40 mph downhill from the Slochd with a following wind. Obviously so famous it was filmed. :-)

    The new old van on the turntable at Broughton Street. John Richardson and Ian Birrell took an exhibition to Orkney in this
    'state-of-the-art' luxury transport! Fitted out with Dexion shelving it could do 40 mph downhill
    from the Slochd with a following wind. Obviously so famous it was filmed. :-)

    SSERC Bulletin 130 [March 1982] SSERC Bulletin 131 [July 1982] SSERC Bulletin 132 [Aug. 1982] SSERC Bulletin 133 [Nov. 1982]
    130 131 132
    133

     

    marine aquaria

     

    Basic arrangement for a tidal aquarium in SSERC Bulletin 133

    SSERC Bulletin 130 [March 1982]Bulletin 130 complete [PDF - 0.85 MB]

    Introduction —new Assistant Director i
    —Easter Holiday closing 1
    —ASE annual meeting Scottish Region 1
    —‘Hazcards’ 1
    —equipment questionnaire 1
    —eclipse of the sun 1
    CLEAPSE Guides 1
    Safety Notes —organ ising school science for safety 2
    —methanal (formaldehyde) 4
    —accident report 6
    —liquefied petroleum gases (lpg). 7
    Biology Notes —vital capacity apparatus 7
    Chemistry Notes —calorimetry of common fuels 7
    Microelectronics Notes —science interfacing register (SIR) 13
    —micro-electronic technology (MET) panel 14
    In the Workshop —constructional details for vital capacity apparatus 15
    Trade News 17
    Index Bulletins 120-1 29 19

    SSERC Bulletin 125 [Jan. 1981] SSERC Bulletin 126 [March 1981] SSERC Bulletin 127 [April 1981] SSERC Bulletin 128 [June 1981] SSERC Bulletin 128 [Nov. 1981]
    125 126 127
    128
    129

     

    Flame tests


    Flame test techniques in SSERC Bulletin 129

    Cover 118 Cover 119 Cover 120 Cover 121
    118 119 120 121
    Cover 114 Cover 122 Cover 123
    122 123 124

    Display lab in Broughton Street, Edinburgh

    Display lab in Broughton Street, Edinburgh

    SSERC Bulletin 120 [April 1980]

    Introduction — Planning Committee reorganisation Page 1.
    — SSSERC subscriptions 1.
    Biology Notes — bioluminescence 2.
    Physics Notes — demonstration digital display 5.
    In the Workshop ‘I 6.
    — modified deflagrating spoons
    Trade News 9.
    Address List 10.
    Index, Nos. 110—119 11.

    Cover 110 Cover 111 Cover 112 Cover 113
    110 111 112 113
    Cover 114 Cover 115 Cover 116 Cover 117
    114 115 116 117

    Bulletin 110 complete [PDF - 642 KB]

    Introduction hazardous chemicals manual Page 1
    Biology No — performance testing of autoclaves 1.
    — ocygen meters — d—i—y circuits 2.
    Chemistry Notes — regenerating a mixed bed ion exchange resin 5.
    Phyis Notes — surplus equipment 8.
    — the short, short life of o.h.p. lamp bulbs 9.
    Address List 10.
    Bulletin Index, \Tos 100—109 11.

    Cover 102 Cover 12 Cover 104

    Cover 105

    102 103 104 105
    Cover 106 Cover 107 Cover 108 Cover 109
    106 107 108 109
    Cover 94 Cover 95 Cover 96 Cover 97
    94 95 96 97
    Cover 98 Cover 99 Cover 100 Cover 101
    98 99 100 101

    Bulletin 100 complete [PDF - 864 KB]

    Introduction — biiiopraphv of safety manuals Page 1.
    — our centenary issue 1.
    Saturday closing dates 1.
    Biology Notes — the Elodea experiment 2.
    — water sample collecting jar 3.
    Physics Notes — surplus equipment 5.
    — radiation hazard for heart pace—maker wearers 7.
    - a self-maintained tuning fork 8.
    Address List 10.
    Bulletin Index Nos. 90 — 99 11.

    Cover 86 Cover 12 Cover 88 Cover 89
    86 87 88 89
    Cover 90 Cover 91 Cover 92 Cover 93
    90 91 92 93

    Bulletin 90 complete [PDF - 664 KB]

    Introduction — chemistry equipment list Page 1.
    — session 1976/77 programme 1.
    — footnote 2.
    Opinion — telephone troubles 2.
    Biology Notes — microbiology again 3.
    Chemistry Notes — vacuum filtration with a syringe pump 5.
    — sodium absorption effect 5.
    Physics Notes — photo—transistor alternative 6.
    — average and rms values of alternating current 7.
    — variable focus lens 7.
    Trade News 8.
    Address List 10.
    Bulletin Index Nose 80 — 89 11.

     Cover 76 Cover 77 Cover 78 Cover 79  Cover 80
    76 77 78 79 80
    Cover 81 Cover 49 Cover 83 Cover 84 Cover 52
    81 82 83 84 85

    Bulletin 83 complete [PDF - 1.02 MB]

    Introduction — surplus equipment Page 1.
    Opinion 2
    Biology Abstracts — transport systems 3.
    — respiration 3.
    — photosynthesis 4.
    — nutrition 4.
    — growth 5.
    — reproduction 5.
    — movement 5.
    — sensitivity 5.
    — ecology 5.
    — microscopy 6.
    - husbandry 7.
    Physics Notes — surplus equipment 8.
    — fire—resistant paint offer 10.
    Trade News 11.
    Address List 12.

    Bulletin 82 complete [PDF - 927 KB]

    Introduction — cost index Page 1.
    Opinion - The Health and Safety at Work Act 1.
    Chemistry Abstracts — general 3,,
    — thermo-chemistry and thermodynamics 3
    — chemical dynamics 4.
    — electro—chemistry 4.
    — colloid chemistry 5
    — molecular weight 5.
    — chemical compounds 5
    — chemical structure in relation to properties 6.
    — experimental and preparative chemistry 6.
    — measurement and instrumentation 7.
    — physical methods of analysis 7.
    — chromatography 7
    — organic chemistry 8.
    — gaseous fuels 8
    — workshop practice 9.
    — safety 9.
    Bulletin Supplement — low voltage power units 11.
    Address list 12.

    Bulletin 81 complete [PDF - 807 KB]

    Introduction — overseas subscriptions Page 1.
    — bulletin abstracts 1.
    Physics Abstracts — mathematical logic 2.
    — measurement 2.
    — mecianics 2.
    — dynamics 2.
    — energy conversions 3.
    — fuid mechanics
    — waves Li..
    — gas laws LI.
    — sound LI.
    — optics 5.
    — heat 5.
    — electrostatics 6.
    — current electricity 6.
    — electromagnetism 8.
    — a.c. theory 8.
    — electronics 9.
    — atomic physics 9.
    — meteorology 10.
    — workshop practice 10.
    Trade News 10.
    Address List 12.

    Bulletin 80 complete [PDF - 769 KB]

    Introduction — basic and workshop equipment list Page 1.
    Biology Notes — disinfectants 1.
    In The Workshop — flask shaker 6.
    Address List 10.
    Bulletin Index, Nos. 70 — 79 11.

    Cover 68 Cover 69 Cover 70 Cover 71
    68 69 70 71
    Cover 72 Cover 73 Cover 74 Cover 75
    72 73 74 75

    Bulletin 70 complete [PDF - 727 KB]

    Introduction — disposal of hazardous chemicals Page 1
    Physics Notes — pen recorder as a timing device 2
    Chemistry Notes — decomposition of ammonia 4.
    — a fatal experiment 5
    — thermochromic liquid recipe 5
    Trade News 5
    Electronic Calculators 7
    Address List 10
    Bulletin Index Nos. 60—69

     

    Cover 60 Cover 61 Cover 62 Cover 63
    60 61 62 63
    Cover 64 Cover 65 Cover 66 Cover 67
    64 65 66 67

    Bulletin 60 complete [PDF - 1.04 MB]

    Introduction — H.M.S.O. safety pamphlets Page 1
    — Regulations governing the disposal of poisonous waste I
    Opinion - Apparatus kits 2
    Physics Notes — Testing transistors 4.
    Biology Notes — Gas analysis 6
    — Supply of pharbitis nil 8
    Chemistry Notes — Sulphur trioxide preparation 8
    Trade News
    In the Workshop - Respiration module 9
    Address List 10
    Bulletin Index
    Nos. 50 — 59 11

    Cover 53 Cover 54 Cover 55
    53 54 55
    Cover 56 Cover 57 Cover 58 Cover 59
    56 57 58 59
     Cover 44 Cover 45 Cover 46 Cover 47
    44 45 46 47
    Cover 48 Cover 49 Cover 50 Cover 51 Cover 52
    48 49 50 51 52

    Cover 50Bulletin 50 complete [PDF - 1 MB]

    Introduction — secondment of director Page 1
    Biology Notes — gas analysis I
    — test procedure correction
    — dissecting pins L.
    — aquaria for Xenopus 4.
    — Laboratory hazards 5
    In The Workshop — wind direction recorder 5
    Address List 10
    Bulletin Index, Nos. 40 - 49.

    Cover 36 Cover 37 Cover 38 Cover 39
    36 37 38 39
    Cover 40 Cover 41 Cover 42 Cover 43
    40 41 42 43

    Cover 40Bulletin 40 complete [PDF - 698 KB]

    Introduction — surplus equipment Page 1
    — bulletin reprints 1
    — Development Committee 2
    Opinion — hazardous chemicals 2
    Chemistry Notes — hazardous chemicals 3
    — laboratory accidents 4.
    — disposal of hazardous chemicals
    — explosion hazard of ethers 5
    Integrated Science Course 6
    Display Laboratory 7
    Physics Notes — kinetic energy experiment 8
    Address List 10
    Bulletin Index, Nos. 30 - 39  11

     

    Cover 28 Cover 29 Cover 30 Cover 31
    28 29 30 31
    Cover 32 Cover 33 Cover 34 Cover 35
    32 33 34 35
    Some image links from 1969
    Moon plaque

    Cover 30Bulletin 30 complete [PDF - 831 KB]

    Introduction— equipment lists 1
    — exhibition 1
    — postal code 1
    Opinion— S.I. Units 1
    Trade News 3
    Chemistry Notes - stuck glass tubing 5
    In The Workshop - plankton net 5
    - meter mount 6
    Supplement - low voltage transformers 7
    Address List 7
    Bulletin Index, Nos. 20 — 29

    Cover 19 Cover 20 Cover 21 Cover 22
    19 20 21 22
    Cover 23 Cover 24 Cover 25 Cover 26 Cover 27
    23 24 25 26 27

    Cover 20Bulletin 20 complete [PDF - 1.17 MB]

    Introduction Page 1
    OpInion — Science Fairs 1
    Physics Notes — density gradient column 2
    — macro-Millikan apparatus 3
    Display Laboratory 3
    Trade News L.
    Chemistry Notes — molecular weight determination 6
    — split mercury threads 6
    In The Workshop — small scale filtration 6
    — gas generator 7
    — pulse beat display 8
    Address List 10
    Bulletin Index, Nos. 10 - 19  11

    Cover 3 Cover 4 Cover 5 Cover 6
    3 4 5 6
    Cover 7 Cover 8 Cover 9 Cover 10
    7 8 9 10

    Cover 10Bulletin 10 complete [PDF - 1.22 MB]

    Introduction - Bulletin indices and "don't throw away your old Bulletins". Page 1.
    Conductivity Experiments - 15 successful experiments carried out to provide evidence for the existence of ions and of their mobility in solution. Two versions of electrolytic cell are available.
    (1) a beaker’ with electrodes pushed through a top cover which may be of hardboard or plastic.
    (2) a conical flask with special side entry hole or holes to accommodate the electrodes. 1.
    Trade News 6.
    In the Workshop - Low Voltage Power Unit - The simplest possible method of generating uni-directional from alternating current is to place a rectifier in series with the load. Add a capacitor in parallel with the load, and we have a degree of smoothing which will depend on the current taken. A potentiometer across the output is a refinement which costs little, and allows the voltage to be continuously varied. 8.
    Address List 10.

    Cover 1 Cover 2
    1 2

    Broughton Street

    Where it all began - Broughton Street in Edinburgh

     

     

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    NOTE :- When following health & safety or equipment advice you should be aware when the advice was published.

    2017 [77 - 80]

    PS&T Bulletin 77 PS&T Bulletin 78 PS&T Bulletin 79 PS&T Bulletin 80

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    PB 20  
    20 - Autumn

     

     

    The Excellent Science Department: A Guide to its Leadership and Self-evaluation

    The 2nd edition of this publication was written by Jim Stafford (formerly a Principal Teacher of Biology, a Local Authority Science Adviser and Quality Improvement Officer with East Ayrshire Council), and published in November 2014.

    The aim of this booklet is to provide a ready point of reference on the key aspects of leading a secondary science department. Since the publication of the first edition in 2007, there have been significant changes to the science curriculum in Scotland's secondary schools and some 200 teachers have participated in leadership training with SSERC. As a result of these changes and of the feedback from leadership courses, this second edition has been revised accordingly throughout and sections on leading professional learning and developing a leadership culture added.

    Although the booklet will be of particular interest to those who hold promoted posts for science subjects, it should also be valuable to school senior managers, local authority officers and others who have responsibility for the quality of education in secondary schools. It should also be useful to all science teachers as the ultimate aim of leadership and self-evaluation is to improve the quality of the science learning and teaching experiences provided by teachers in school laboratories. It is hoped that this booklet can be read from all these different perspectives so that everyone involved in science education can further develop their contribution to the quality of science education in the secondary school.

    In his foreword to The Excellent Science Department, Ken Cunningham CBE, FRSA (General Secretary, School Leaders Scotland) makes the following observation:

    This booklet picks up all the key themes that any aspiring or existing Principal Teacher (or Faculty Head) would wish to have at their fingertips. It sets out best practice across a whole range of aspects of leading and managing a Science department. It is thorough, well researched, tied very much to years of quality experience.

    Registered members may request printed copies from This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or a pdf version can be accessed here.


    The Modern Science Teacher

    This booklet, written by Jim Stafford, aims to support new and recently qualified science teachers as they embark on their professional careers. The booklet seeks to provide a ready reference point on the key issues that have to be taken into account when devising science courses for the 21st century. Topics covered include the organisation of the science teaching laboratory, CPD, action research, self-evaluation and school inspections. Although the booklet is intended for those who have just entered the profession it should also be useful to those who support, supervise and manage new and recently qualified science teachers.

    In his foreword to The Modern Science Teacher, Professor Graham Donaldson CB makes the following observation:

    This booklet is relevant for all science teachers, irrespective of whether they have recently qualified or have been teaching for many years. It supports the reflective and enquiring culture which should increasingly characterise all Scotland’s schools and learning communities.

    Registered members may request printed copies of the booklet from This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or a pdf version can be accessed here.

    Members - please log in to gain access to all resources. Visitors - please contact SSERC for membership & website access.